Thursday, June 7, 2012

latest coverage on incidents in West Papua


1) Revenge-hungry soldiers open fire

2) TNI Soldiers Allegedly Attack Papua Village, Kill One
3) Papua’s Security Conditions Unstable
4) Violence Continues With Two More Papua Shootings
5) Lawmakers Plan Papua Visit Amid Escalating Violence
6) Activists and army clash in troubled West Papua
7) Jayapura Man Shot by Police After Exchanging Words: Papua Activist
8) Violence Continues With Two More Papua Shootings
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http://www.couriermail.com.au/ipad/soldiers-open-fire-on-papua-crowd/story-fn6ck55c-1226388421039

1) Revenge-hungry soldiers open fire

Deadly dispute: Indonesian soldiers have killed one person, injured 17 and set fire to homes after residents who were angry over a motorcycle accident stabbed a solider to death. Picure: AFP Source: AF

ONE person was killed and 17 wounded when Indonesian soldiers opened fire on civilians after a deadly dispute.
The conflict was sparked by a road accident in Papua province, police said yesterday.
The shootings took place late on Wednesday after residents, angry that two soldiers on a motorcycle hit and injured a child, stabbed one of the troops to death and seriously injured the other in the city of Wamena, police said.
"Following the road accident soldiers from the local military arrived in two trucks and took revenge by firing gunshots toward local residents and setting a number of houses on fire," said national police spokesman Saud Usman Nasution.
"The trouble then spread to the city centre where a number of shops and houses were also damaged by gunshots," he said.
Jhon Wetipo, in charge of the Jayawijaya district of which Wamena is the capital, said the soldiers shot one man dead and wounded 17 people, one of them critically.
He said troops set 37 homes on fire, but that calm had been restored by yesterday morning.
The provincial military spokesman denied that there had been a shooting or that troops had set fire to homes but residents supported the police version of events.
Indonesian security forces are widely accused of abusing the basic rights of indigenous Melanesians in Papua, where a low-level insurgency has simmered for decades.
In 1969, Indonesia took control of Papua, a former Dutch colony on the western half of New Guinea island, after a vote among a select group of Papuans widely seen as a sham.
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2) TNI Soldiers Allegedly Attack Papua Village, Kill One
Banjir Ambarita | June 07, 2012
One man was fatally shot and seven others were injured on Thursday after a group of Indonesian Military (TNI) soldiers allegedly attacked a village in Papua, according to locals in Honai Lama village in the Wamena subdistrict, near Jayawijaya.

“Those soldiers went berserk and destroyed and burned down villagers’ houses, a church and a school. They also allegedly shot a resident named Eliamus Nyoman,” a member of the Papua Legislative Council, Nason Uti, said on Thursday. He said Eliamus died, while the seven injured villagers were taken to the hospital. 

Just a day earlier, an angry mob attacked two TNI soldiers riding a motorcycle through the village after they allegedly almost hit a child on the street.

One soldier, First Private Sahlan was stabbed to death, while the other, Second Sgt. Pardede, was badly wounded and eventually transferred to a Jayapura hospital on Thursday.

Nason said that Thursday’s alleged attack at Honai Lama village might have been in retaliation for Sahlan’s death — he urged investigation into the incident.

“Why should they have taken revenge? There is legal process to settle such problems. The military command must take action against its members involved in the village attack,” Nason said.

But Infantry Col. Ali Bogra, the spokesman of the Papua Military Command, denied that the attack on the village took place at all.

“I have not received any report on the incident. We’ve stationed our soldiers around the area; no one is wandering around,” Ali said. “After yesterday’s incident, the situation is under control now. There are no other significant things happening.”

Papua Police deputy chief Brig. Gen. Paulus Waterpauw, however, admitted that a civilian died in Honai Lama, although he said nothing of the soldiers’ alleged attack. “A villager died after the TNI soldiers were attacked by a mob,” Paulus said. 

He added the situation in Wamena was improving.
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3) Papua’s Security Conditions Unstable
Thursday, 07 June, 2012 | 19:29 WIB
TEMPO InteractiveJakarta:Presidential spokesman Julian Pasha said that the recent sporadic shootings in Papua indicated the strong existence of a group of people who were clearly bent on disrupting peace in Papua. “The situation in Papua is highly unstable,” Julian Pasha said on Wednesday, June 6. He reiterated that Indonesia would take firm action to control the tense security conditions and to prevent further shooting incidents from occurring.

"These (shootings) must not happen again," he said. However, until now the government has not yet decided whether to provide reinforcement to the troops in Papua. "We'll see later (if there is need for reinforcement)," he said.

Obviously, Julian added, this condition calls for a special handling [of the matter]. "If there's a request from the Papua police, TNI [the military] will be proactive in a synergy with police to help handle the situation," he said. Local police have said that they are tracking down unidentified men who shot and wounded three civilians and a soldier in three separate attacks in Papua. Two men were riding on a motorcycle in Jayapura when they were attacked by a gunman on another motorcycle late on Tuesday, Papuan deputy police chief Paulus Waterpauw said police were investigating the three separate attacks.

Coordinating Minister for Political, Legal and Security Affairs Djoko Suyanto explained that he already received a report yesterday, Tuesday, June 5, at about 22:00 hrs local time that shootings had taken place in three different places. To date, Djoko said, the shooters had not yet been identified. The first victim was Iqbal Rifai, 22, a resident of Hamadi Pasar, who was shot on Jalan Sam Ratulang, Jayapura, in front of Papua's Transportation Service office. Also shot at the same location was Hardi Jayanto, 22, a resident of Klofkam.

Also victimized was First Private Frangki Kune, 25, with address Den Zipur Waena. Frangki was shot on Jalan Abepura Entrop at Perum Pemda 1 Entrop (govt employees housing complex) in front of CV Thomas. "He suffered a gunshot wound through his neck," he said. Djoko reported that the three victims were in intensive care, Jayapura's Regional Hospital.

ARYANI KRISTANTI

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4) Violence Continues With Two More Papua Shootings
Camelia Pasandaran & Banjir Ambarita | June 07, 2012
Violence continued to escalate in Papua on Thursday as gunmen shot a woman and a police officer in the latest incidents of separate shootings in the restive province this week. 

A 20-year-old man was also shot on Thursday morning in Jayapura. In total, eight people have been shot — and one soldier stabbed — in the province since Monday. 

On Thursday afternoon, police officer Brig. Laedi was shot by two unknown gunmen in the Angkaisera district, Papua Police spokesman Adj. Sr. Comr. Yohanes Nugroho Wicaksono said. 

"Angkaisera police were shot at by unidentified gunmen," Yohanes said. "One officer was shot on the left side of his waist."

Police chased the gunmen, but they reportedly fled into the jungle, Yohanes said. 

“We are still investigating whether this is revenge for the raid of an OPM headquarters in that district,” he said. 

Two members of the Free Papua Organization (OPM) were arrested in a raid in Angkaisera on May 31 by members of the police and Indonesian military (TNI). 

In Kerom district, a woman was shot on Thursday by an unidentified gunman, according to Papuan human rights activist Ferry Marisan. She was taken to Abepura hospital and her condition is unknown. 

Police blame the recent surge in violence in Jayapura and surrounding districts on Papua's separatist elements. 

Ferry said he doubted groups like the OPM were behind the attacks, instead pointing the finger at Indonesian security forces. 

“Papua is a place for law enforcement to get promoted,” Ferry said. “Isn't it strange that after a series of shootings, the police cannot find the perpetrators? They always claim the perpetrators are unidentified gunmen. They analyzed the bullet, conducted ballistic tests but the results were never made public.”

The activist criticized the Papua Police, saying officers should gather evidence before placing the blame on groups like the OPM, which is based in Puncak Jaya, more than 400 kilometers from the provincial capital. 

“Their base camp is in Puncak Jaya, not in Jayapura,” Ferry said. “Jayapura is not a big city, where there is only one main road running north to south. There is no way for OPM members to hide without being caught by police.”

Ferry said the Indonesian government has an interest in prolonging the conflict in Papua. 

“If there is conflict here, there will be money from the central government for the police and military to solve the case,” he said.
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5) Lawmakers Plan Papua Visit Amid Escalating Violence
Ezra Sihite | June 07, 2012
Lawmakers plan to visit Indonesia’s restive Papua province, following reports of escalating violence that have included the shootings of civilians and security officers over the past week.

Members of the House of Representatives’ Commission I, overseeing defense and foreign affairs, are slated to make the visit next week, with commission head Mahfudz Siddiq to lead the team, his deputy Tubagus Hasanuddin said in Jakarta on Thursday.

“The recent development of the situation shows escalating tension, marked with shootings of civilians and security officers, with none of the perpetrators having been found,” Tubagus said.

House Deputy Speaker Priyo Budi Santoso said House leaders had approved of the plan, adding that the delegation's visit was expected to push law enforcers to find the perpetrators.

“Next week we will send them [Commission I members] to monitor what’s actually happening,” Priyo said.

“Arrest the troublemakers and make them learn their lesson. Law must be upheld,” he added.

Violence is not new to restive Papua, but in the past couple of weeks, shootings have taken place with increasing frequency.

On Thursday alone, there were reportedly three people shot, two of whom died, including a police officer.

An Indonesian military (TNI) soldier died and another was badly wounded on Wednesday when an angry mob attacked the duo after they almost hit a child on a street in Wamena, Jayawijaya, while riding a motorcycle. A civil servant was shot and killed near the mayor's office in Jayapura the same day. 

On Tuesday, unidentified gunmen shot and injured two civilians and a TNI soldier in separate attacks in Jayapura, the provincial capital. Monday saw a 16-year-old student shot and wounded, also in Jayapura.

No one has been arrested for the attacks, which came a week after a German tourist was shot and wounded in a drive-by shooting in Jayapura on May 29.

BeritaSatu/JG
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6) Activists and army clash in troubled West Papua
Michael Bachelard
June 8, 2012
                        JAKARTA: Indonesian soldiers went on a rampage in the troubled province of West Papua early yesterday, killing at least one person, injuring 10 others, one critically, and burning down dozens of buildings.
But an Indonesian military spokesman denied anybody had died and accused separatists in the remote town of Wamena of burning their own shops down.
A Catholic priest in Wamena, Franz Lieshout, confirmed the rampage late yesterday, but told the Herald that earlier reports by activists of eight dead were not true.
Father Lieshout said a meeting between the warring parties yesterday had soothed the dispute.
"The government had a meeting with all the elements of the people here from the churches, from the young people from the different tribes and from the army and they decided that they all want to have peace," he said.
"People are still afraid but the situation now is good."
The violence reportedly began on Wednesday afternoon after two soldiers from Kostrad, the Indonesian Army's strategic reserve, ran over a boy playing by the side of the road in the outlying village of Honai Lama.
In revenge, the soldiers were dragged from their motorcycle and beaten by villagers. One died after allegedly being stabbed and the other was hospitalised.
When news reached them of their comrade's death, the soldiers' battalion mobilised. Papuan witnesses claimed the soldiers opened fire in Wamena using live rounds, firing at anybody appearing to be Papuan.
Activist group West Papua Media reported that eight people were dead and 19 injured, with 100 houses set alight by soldiers from Battalion 756. Earlier reports suggested kiosks and shops had been hit with flame throwers.
The activists' reports also claimed that elite police units Brimob and the counter-terrorist Detachment 88 mobilised.
Local human rights sources claimed that ''scores'' of people had been beaten or shot.
The executive secretary of the Papua NGO Forum, Septer Manufandu, last night told the Herald he was still waiting on confirmation of events, but his best information was that nine people were shot by soldiers, and one killed. He said many houses had been burned down as well as one police station. But an army spokesman, Colonel Ali Hamdan Bogra, said soldiers had been prevented by their commander from going to the village to take revenge for the death of their comrade.
''There was no clash, nothing, that's it,'' he said. Two shops were burned, but ''definitely not by us, it must be the people. This is the old tactic of the separatists,'' he said. The situation was now under control.
An Australian academic, Budi Hernawan, said the situation was still very tense last night as police vehicles patrolled the streets.
Wamena, the remote capital of the mountainous district of Jayawijaya, is one of a number of Papuan areas supportive of the Free Papua Movement's campaign to gain independence from Indonesia.
Activists periodically raise the illegal Morning Star flag and there has been a long history of allegations of human rights violations in the area

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7) Jayapura Man Shot by Police After Exchanging Words: Papua Activist
Camelia Pasandaran & Banjir Ambarita | June 07, 2012
Jayapura Police officers allegedly shot a drunk 20-year-old in the head after the man mouthed-off to passing officers, a Papuan human rights activist said on Thursday. 

The activist’s comments cast a new light on a shooting that was originally denied by a police spokesman on Thursday morning. According to activist Ferry Marisan, Seus Tabuni, also known as Terius, was drunk at a stall on Sam Ratulangi Street near the University of Yapis at 8:15 a.m. on Thursday when he shouted at two passing police officers. 

The officers reportedly opened fire, Ferry said. 

“I do not know what Seus said, but the police officers reportedly shot him in his leg,” he said. 

Seus then ran toward the river, but was shot twice in the head, Ferry said. 

“The bullet traveled from the top of his head to his mouth,” Ferry said. “All the witnesses saw that he was shot by two police officers.”

Papua Police Adj. Sr. Comr. Yohannes Nugroho confirmed the shooting, saying: “I’ve just got the report that members of Jayapura Police shot a civilian.”

According to Yohannes, Seus was begging passing vehicles for change when he was approached by Jayapura Police. The officers fired warning shots, accidentally hitting Seus in the head, he said. 

Papua Police deputy chief Brig. Gen. Paulus Waterpauw confirmed the shooting, but did not offer any details as to what happened. 

“Yes, it happened this morning,” he told the Jakarta Globe. 

Paulus’ phone then lost service and dropped the call. Additional calls failed to connect. 

It is unknown whether the officers have been questioned about the incident.

Eight people have been shot in Papua since Monday, including six in the provincial capital.

The recent surge in violence has prompted lawmakers to plan a visit to the restive province.
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8) Violence Continues With Two More Papua Shootings
Camelia Pasandaran & Banjir Ambarita | June 07, 2012
Violence continued to escalate in Papua on Thursday as gunmen shot a woman and a police officer in the latest incidents of separate shootings in the restive province this week. 

A 20-year-old man was also shot on Thursday morning in Jayapura. In total, eight people have been shot — and one soldier stabbed — in the province since Monday. 

On Thursday afternoon, police officer Brig. Laedi was shot by two unknown gunmen in the Angkaisera district, Papua Police spokesman Adj. Sr. Comr. Yohanes Nugroho Wicaksono said. 

"Angkaisera police were shot at by unidentified gunmen," Yohanes said. "One officer was shot on the left side of his waist."

Police chased the gunmen, but they reportedly fled into the jungle, Yohanes said. 

“We are still investigating whether this is revenge for the raid of an OPM headquarters in that district,” he said. 

Two members of the Free Papua Organization (OPM) were arrested in a raid in Angkaisera on May 31 by members of the police and Indonesian military (TNI). 

In Kerom district, a woman was shot on Thursday by an unidentified gunman, according to Papuan human rights activist Ferry Marisan. She was taken to Abepura hospital and her condition is unknown. 

Police blame the recent surge in violence in Jayapura and surrounding districts on Papua's separatist elements. 

Ferry said he doubted groups like the OPM were behind the attacks, instead pointing the finger at Indonesian security forces. 

“Papua is a place for law enforcement to get promoted,” Ferry said. “Isn't it strange that after a series of shootings, the police cannot find the perpetrators? They always claim the perpetrators are unidentified gunmen. They analyzed the bullet, conducted ballistic tests but the results were never made public.”

The activist criticized the Papua Police, saying officers should gather evidence before placing the blame on groups like the OPM, which is based in Puncak Jaya, more than 400 kilometers from the provincial capital. 

“Their base camp is in Puncak Jaya, not in Jayapura,” Ferry said. “Jayapura is not a big city, where there is only one main road running north to south. There is no way for OPM members to hide without being caught by police.”

Ferry said the Indonesian government has an interest in prolonging the conflict in Papua. 

“If there is conflict here, there will be money from the central government for the police and military to solve the case,” he said.
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