Thursday, October 4, 2012

1) House bangs drum of war in Papua

http://m.thejakartapost.com/news/2012/10/04/house-bangs-drum-war-papua.html
1) House bangs drum of war in Papua1) House bangs drum of war in Papua defense has also pushed the government and President Susilo Bambang Yudhoyono to endorse any efforts by the Indonesian Military (TNI) to deal with the separatist movement in the country’s resource rich easternmost province.

“The law on the TNI mandates the institution to conduct military operations in times of war and at other times when terrorism or separatist movements occur. It is clear that the TNI could have legal justification to deal with separatist movement in Papua and in other parts of the country,” Tubagus Hasanuddin Commission I deputy chairman said during a meeting on Wednesday.

Tubagus said that the House was yet to give political support for any TNI offensive against the separatist movement in Papua, but it would not hesitate to back it if the occasion demanded.

“To keep Papua integrated with the country we must encourage the TNI to do what they have to do in Papua, by showing our political support,” said Tubagus of the Indonesian Democratic Party of Struggle (PDI-P) in a meeting between the Attorney General’s Office (AGO), Commission I and officials from the TNI, the Home Ministry, the National Counterterrorism Agency (BNPT), the National Intelligence Agency (BIN) and the National Police.

Article 7 of the Law No. 34/2004 on the TNI stipulates that the military is responsible to defend the sovereignty and integrity of the nation, as well as to protect its people, through military and non-military operations.

The article also stipulates that military operations are only allowed in times of war, whereas non-military campaigns are possible in dealing with an armed separatist movement, armed rebellion, terrorism and border security.

Tubagus said that the separatist movement are now gaining ground in Papua and abroad.

“Certain pro-independence figures, who are living overseas, use this opportunity to nurture opposition against the government. The people have obviously welcomed [the idea of independence]. Therefore, we must seriously do something about it,” Tubagus said.

The government denied that there was an escalation of tension in Papua. Home Minister Gamawan Fauzi claimed that the government could maintain peace in Papua, while continuously conducting a “constructive dialogue” with many elements in the Papuan community.

Gamawan said that the government is treading a fine line between respecting human rights and maintaining security and sovereignty in Papua.

“The government bases efforts to reach any solutions to conflicts on principles that promotes the sovereignty of the nation, affirmative and non-violent policies and human rights,” Gamawan said.

Separately, Free Papua Movement (OPM) leader Lambertus Pekikir said that the central government had failed in its effort to bring peace in Papua. Lambertus said that Indonesian government had been imposing its will on Papua and refused to acknowledge that efforts for a peaceful resolutions had failed.

He said that one of examples of the government’s lapse was its refusal to acknowledge on-going violence in Papua, which has been put into the spotlight by the international community.

“Having said that, all of us must sit down and talk seriously and honestly about what has been happening here. Give us a chance to tell our version of the story. People say that Indonesia is a democratic country. Please let democracy prevail in Papua,” he said.


--------------
http://www.rnzi.com/pages/news.php?op=read&id=71353
2) O’Neill’s Papua comment seen as shift in PNG policy
Posted at 05:51 on 04 October, 2012UTC
The announcement by the Prime Minister of Papua New Guinea that he will raise concernsj about human rights abuses in neighbouring Papua with Indonesia has been described as a departure in government policy.
Peter O’Neill told local television that the plight of the Melanesians across the border in Indonesia needs to be brought to light.
Professor Ron May of the Australian National University’s State, Society and Governance in Melanesia programme says the statement represents a change from PNG’s longheld position.
He said successive governments have prioritised good relations with Indonesia over standing up for the rights of West Papuans.
“There are a couple of people in parliament now however who have shown some inclination to take this on. But it also reflects the deteriorating situation in West Papua: we’re getting increasing reports of human rights abuses and reports of increasing activity amongst West Papuan separatists.”
Professor Ron May
-----




http://www.rnzi.com/pages/news.php?op=read&id=71353
O’Neill’s Papua comment seen as shift in PNG policy
Posted at 05:51 on 04 October, 2012UTC
The announcement by the Prime Minister of Papua New Guinea that he will raise concerns about human rights abuses in neighbouring Papua with Indonesia has been described as a departure in government policy.
Peter O’Neill told local television that the plight of the Melanesians across the border in Indonesia needs to be brought to light.
Professor Ron May of the Australian National University’s State, Society and Governance in Melanesia programme says the statement represents a change from PNG’s longheld position.
He said successive governments have prioritised good relations with Indonesia over standing up for the rights of West Papuans.
“There are a couple of people in parliament now however who have shown some inclination to take this on. But it also reflects the deteriorating situation in West Papua: we’re getting increasing reports of human rights abuses and reports of increasing activity amongst West Papuan separatists.”
Professor Ron May
-----

No comments:

Post a Comment