Friday, May 2, 2014

1) Papua military confiscate 28 weapons from separatists

1) Papua military confiscate 28 weapons from separatists
2) TNI confiscates 28 rifles  from OPM
3) West Papua: Indonesia Ignores Indigenous Expertise In Fight Against HIV 
4) Politics hinders the fight against HIV in West Papua
5) COMMITTEE ON ECONOMIC, SOCIAL AND CULTURAL RIGHTS CONSIDERS REPORT OF INDONESIA
6) Two Papuans assaulted for preventing police brutality
7) LITERACY RATE IN LANNY JAYA REGENCY INCREASES

8) KASUBDEN BRIMOB BIAK REPLACED AFTER SHOOTING INCIDENT BY A MEMBER OF BRIMOB
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1) Papua military confiscate 28 weapons from separatists

Fri, May 2 2014 20:43 | 295 Views
Jayapura, Papua (ANTARA News) - The Indonesian Military has seized 28 weapons from a separatist group during the period between January and April 2014, noted the Cendrawasih XVII Regional Military Commander Mayor General Christian Zebua.

"The 28 weapons of varying types were seized by the military personnel operating in the Puncak District," Zebua remarked during an interview to Antara after the Promotion Ceremony here, on Friday.

He claimed that the seized weapons were SS-1 Pindad, M-16, AK-47, Mouser, FN-46 pistol, air rifle, air soft gun, and homemade weapons.

In order to acknowledge their efforts and achievements, the Indonesian Army Chief of Staff General Budiman bestowed honors on 23 army soldiers who operated in the remote areas in Papua following the seizure of the weapons.

The 23 soldiers who received the honors were from infantry battalion 751, battalion 753, and battalion 754. 

Of the 23 soldiers, Private Chief Sugiarto received the honor posthumously.

The army leader also bestowed honors on four army officers who served in three battalions.

"The army leader hoped that giving these honors to the privates and officers of the Indonesian Army will encourage other soldiers to follow suit and be focused," Zebua noted. (*)
Editor: Heru
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2) TNI confiscates 28 rifles  from OPM
Nethy Dharma Somba, The Jakarta Post, Jayapura | Archipelago | Fri, May 02 2014, 5:03 PM
Cendrawasih Military chief Maj. Gen. Christian Zebua said the Army (TNI) had confiscated 28 rifles from the separatist group the Free Papua Movement (OPM) between January to April during territorial operations in Papua.
"The 28 weapons were SS-1, M-16 and AK-47 assault rifles; a mouser rifle; FN-46 pistol; air guns; airsoft guns; and several homemade weapons," Christian said on Friday.
Christian was speaking during a promotion ceremony for 23 soldiers within the Cendrawasih Military Command.
"These lads were promoted because they had succeeded in confiscating OPM weapons. Unfortunately we lost chief Pvt. Sugiarto in the line of duty,” he said.
Besides the Cendrawasih Military Command soldiers, six other soldiers from different divisions were also promoted.
Christian said besides confiscating the rifles, these soldiers had also managed to foil the smuggling attempt of 900 kilograms of ammonium nitrate at the Indonesia-Malaysia borders in Bengkayang regency in West Kalimantan province.
“I hope these achievements won’t slow us down and turn us complacent,” he said.(fss/dic)



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226 THOUSAND HECTARES OF FOREST IN PAPUA WILL BE “CLEARED”


Jayapura, 1/5 (Jubi) – Almost 226,000 hectares of forest in Papua will be cleared and converted into plantations, an environmental group said.
Some private companies are awaiting approval from the Papua provincial government to open palm oil, Industrial Plantation Forest ( HTI ) and other agricultural plantations, a researcher from the Papua Environmental Foundation, Nafli Lessil told tabloidjubi.com on Thursday ( 1/5).
He said the Environmental Management Agency of Papua province had requested feedback from the public regarding plans to open palm oil and cassava plantations in several areas in Papua.
“The size of forests that will be converted are likely to grow. Currently, seven companies are known to have plans to convert approximately 226,000 hectares of forest,” Lessil said.
The seven companies are PT. Berkat Cipta Abadi , PT. Visi Hajau Nusantara, PT. Wahana Agri Karya, PT. Duta Visi Global, PT. China Gate Agriculture , PT.Wanamulia Sukses Sejati Unit III , and PT . Sariwana Adi Perkasa .
“About 3 percent or 80.299 hectares of forest areas in Boven Digoel regency will be deliberately exploited by four palm oil companies, PT. Berkat Cipta Abadi, PT. Visi Hijau Nusantara, PT. Wahana Agri Karya and PT. Duta Visi Global.
“In addition, approximately 116,695 hectares of land in Merauke regency will be turned into plantations, 20,000 hectares of which is intended for cassava cultivation. While 8,950 hectares of land in Nabire will be for oil palm plantations,” he said .
This condition is very worrying as it not only could it damage the forest ecosystems, flora and fauna but also threaten the existence of communities, he said.
“Yes, there is a positive impact, but in my opinion, the negative impact is huge. So the Government of Papua Province and regencies should be careful and wiser. It is better to reflect and learn from the cases that occurred in Sumatra, before it ‘s too late, ” he appealed.
Previously, Greenpeace campaigner for Papua, Charles Tawaru said, in between  2005–2009, forest area of Papua was 42 million hectares, but in 2011 only 30.07 million hectares was left.
Every year the average deforestation rate in Papua province is 143,680 ha and  293,000 ha in West Papua.
The expansion of industries such as logging, plantations and mining are the main causes, in addition to regional administration expansion.
The exploitation of Papua’s natural resources has become increasingly out of control because of difficult access to information and lack of government transparency. ( Jubi / Albert/ Tina )
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UNPO 2 May
3) West Papua: Indonesia Ignores Indigenous Expertise In Fight Against HIV 



West Papua faces the highest HIV prevalence rates in Indonesia, 15 times the national average, and the epidemic is fast growing. Although the indigenous population is particularly affected, the government fails to address cultural factors that influence HIV transmission, and ignores Papuan expertise. 

Below is an article published by the East Asia Forum
West Papua, comprised of two provinces in eastern Indonesia, is home to the fastest growing HIV epidemic in the Asia Pacific.
The HIV prevalence rate is 15 times what it is nationally in Indonesia. Approximately 2.5 per cent of the indigenous adult population, and 3 per cent of indigenous youth aged 15–24 are officially recorded as having HIV, though researchers believe that actual rates are much higher. The epidemic is mainly affecting indigenous Papuan youth.

Current responses to the epidemic are dogged with problems. For instance, in Manokwari, the provincial capital of West Papua province, the Preventing Mother-to-Child Transmission of HIV program is very basic. It does not address any cultural factors, such as women’s and men’s high levels of mobility, the difficulty of disclosing HIV status amid fear and stigma, or women’s reticence about caesarean section (the mode of delivery that is often recommended for HIV positive mothers as a last ditch attempt to prevent transmission). The program thus fails to attract many Papuan women as clients, and its services are largely inaccessible to the 70 per cent of the population that live in rural areas.
Inaccessibility is not the only concern. Contemporary West Papua is a site of both covert and overt struggle. The region is splintered by ideological, cultural and material conflict. Unsurprisingly then, the HIV epidemic and responses to it have been thoroughly politicised, though the Indonesian government refuses to accept that political conditions are relevant to HIV.

A critical example of this politicisation of HIV is that Papuan expertise has been largely ignored in the response to the epidemic. Although there are Papuan actors in the HIV response, some of their successful education paradigms have been pushed out by donor models that put too much emphasis on achieving outreach and testing targets as a measure of effectiveness. In other instances, Papuan HIV workers may be passed over in favour of Indonesians who are perceived to have better administrative skills, which service providers need to survive in the current audit culture.
There are some notable exceptions. In Wamena, the main city in the central highlands of Papua province, Papuan ideas, expertise and leadership have been leveraged in positive ways. Klinik Kalvari is an indigenous-run clinic that is unique in West Papua and operates according to its own standards of appropriate care for their indigenous clientele. The clinic employs local staff who can communicate in local languages. It has a nurse who greets people at the door, and shakes hands in line with local cultural norms. Prayer support is available. These may not seem like profound innovations but they represent an enormous improvement on what typically goes on in the Indonesia health system.

Unfortunately, Wamena is the main HIV service centre for perhaps more than 450,000 people from the central highlands area who do not have access to HIV testing and treatment in their home districts. Transportation links are inadequate and expensive, so many people do not access testing or treatment at all. And for those who do, Wamena’s services are already stretched beyond their limits.
Besides rural service delivery and problematic donor paradigms, there are other policy dimensions to consider. Central and local governments maintain tight controls over the actions and funding of NGOs. While international donors may be interested in supporting a local response, Papuan-led NGOs might be hampered by conservative political elements in Jakarta or in West Papua precisely because their organisations promote indigenous expertise and authority over Indonesian leadership.

Indigenous NGOs play a vital role in Indonesia’s efforts to combat the HIV epidemic, but as international donors are directing more attention and funding to West Papua, they are primarily working with government agencies — whether by choice or by compulsion. Unfortunately, government agencies have so far failed to provide effective leadership. What is needed is a West Papua-wide HIV strategy that draws on local best practices, Papuan leadership, and the strength of civil society organisations in the region.
- See more at: http://www.unpo.org/article/17099#sthash.PGo3cxfe.dpuf

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http://www.eastasiaforum.org/2014/05/01/politics-hinders-the-fight-against-hiv-in-west-papua/

4) Politics hinders the fight against HIV in West Papua

Author: Jenny Munro, ANU
West Papua, comprised of two provinces in eastern Indonesia, is home to the fastest growing HIV epidemic in the Asia Pacific.

The HIV prevalence rate is 15 times what it is nationally in Indonesia.Approximately 2.5 per cent of the indigenous adult population, and 3 per cent of indigenous youth aged 15–24 are officially recorded as having HIV, though researchers believe that actual rates are much higher. The epidemic is mainly affecting indigenous Papuan youth.
Current responses to the epidemic are dogged with problems. For instance, in Manokwari, the provincial capital of West Papua province, the Preventing Mother-to-Child Transmission of HIV program is very basic. It does not address any cultural factors, such as women’s and men’s high levels of mobility, the difficulty of disclosing HIV status amid fear and stigma, or women’s reticence about caesarean section (the mode of delivery that is often recommended for HIV positive mothers as a last ditch attempt to prevent transmission). The program thus fails to attract many Papuan women as clients, and its services are largely inaccessible to the 70 per cent of the population that live in rural areas.
Inaccessibility is not the only concern. Contemporary West Papua is a site of both covert and overt struggle. The region is splintered by ideological, cultural and material conflict. Unsurprisingly then, the HIV epidemic and responses to it have been thoroughly politicised, though the Indonesian government refuses to accept that political conditions are relevant to HIV.
A critical example of this politicisation of HIV is that Papuan expertise has beenlargely ignored in the response to the epidemic. Although there are Papuan actors in the HIV response, some of their successful education paradigms have been pushed out by donor models that put too much emphasis on achieving outreach and testing targets as a measure of effectiveness. In other instances, Papuan HIV workers may be passed over in favour of Indonesians who are perceived to have better administrative skills, which service providers need to survive in the current audit culture.
There are some notable exceptions. In Wamena, the main city in the central highlands of Papua province, Papuan ideas, expertise and leadership have beenleveraged in positive ways. Klinik Kalvari is an indigenous-run clinic that is unique in West Papua and operates according to its own standards of appropriate care for their indigenous clientele. The clinic employs local staff who can communicate in local languages. It has a nurse who greets people at the door, and shakes hands in line with local cultural norms. Prayer support is available. These may not seem like profound innovations but they represent an enormous improvement on what typically goes on in the Indonesia health system.
Unfortunately, Wamena is the main HIV service centre for perhaps more than 450,000 people from the central highlands area who do not have access to HIV testing and treatment in their home districts. Transportation links are inadequate and expensive, so many people do not access testing or treatment at all. And for those who do, Wamena’s services are already stretched beyond their limits.
Besides rural service delivery and problematic donor paradigms, there are other policy dimensions to consider. Central and local governments maintain tight controls over the actions and funding of NGOs. While international donors may be interested in supporting a local response, Papuan-led NGOs might be hampered by conservative political elements in Jakarta or in West Papua precisely because their organisations promote indigenous expertise and authority over Indonesian leadership.
Indigenous NGOs play a vital role in Indonesia’s efforts to combat the HIV epidemic, but as international donors are directing more attention and funding to West Papua, they are primarily working with government agencies — whether by choice or by compulsion. Unfortunately, government agencies have so far failed to provide effective leadership. What is needed is a West Papua-wide HIV strategy that draws on local best practices, Papuan leadership, and the strength of civil society organisations in the region.
Jenny Munro is a Research Fellow at the State, Society and Governance in Melanesia Program at The Australian National University. You can follow her on Twitter@DrJennyMunro.
This article is based on research conducted in collaboration with local and international partners (PT. Peduli Sehat, Pacific Peoples Partnership, and Humi Inane Jayawijaya), and funded by the Canadian Institutes of Health Research and the State Society and Governance in Melanesia Program at the ANU. The author would like to thank the men and women who shared their experiences of providing and/or receiving HIV care and testing in West Papua.
The author and her colleagues will be hosting a workshop in Manokwari in May 2014 that will bring together frontline HIV workers from around West Papua to facilitate collaborative learning and priority-setting.

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5) COMMITTEE ON ECONOMIC, SOCIAL AND CULTURAL RIGHTS CONSIDERS REPORT OF INDONESIA
1 May 2014
The Committee on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights today concluded its consideration of the initial report of Indonesia on how the country is implementing the provisions of the International Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights..........................





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6) Two Papuans assaulted for preventing police brutality

ASIAN HUMAN RIGHTS COMMISSION - URGENT APPEALS PROGRAMME
Urgent Appeal Case: AHRC-UAC-064-2014

INDONESIA: Two Papuans assaulted for preventing police brutality
2 May 2014
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INDONESIA: Two Papuans assaulted for preventing police brutality
ISSUES: Arbitrary arrest and detention; inhuman and degrading treatment; police violence; torture
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Dear friends,
The Asian Human Rights Commission (AHRC) has received the information regarding an assault by members of the Mobile Brigade of Nabire District Police on two Papuans in Nabire. The two Papuans were assaulted when they were trying to stop a brutal attack by the police against another Papuan. They were both stabbed and slashed about the back and head, and beaten with guns and wooden sticks by the police.
CASE NARRATIVE:
According to an activist of KINGMI (Gospel Tabernacle Church) Papua, the assault took place on 20 March 2014 in the Senior High School (SMU) complex Yapis Nabire, Papua. Siluwanus Nagapapa was trying to stop the brutal action of ten members of the Mobile Brigade of Nabire District Police against an inebriated Papuan. However, the police were offended by Siluwanus and attacked him by slashing and stabbing him about the head and back.

(Photo: Paulus Kobogau was slashed about the head by police officers in Nabire for attempting to stop the police brutality. Courtesy of KINGMI activist)
Attempting to save himself, Siluwanus Nagapapa fled to the house of Paulus Kobogau. Seeing Siliwunus was bleeding, Paulus tried to prevent the police from getting into his house by standing in front of the door. He asked the police why they were chasing and injuring Siluwanus. Yet, instead of responding to Paulus’s question, the police brutally attacked him. Paulus was stabbed five times in the back and slashed about the head with a knife, kicked, pelted with stones, and struck with a wooden stick as well as guns by the police.
Siluwanus Nagapapa and Paulus Kobogou were later arrested and detained at Nabire District Police Station. After being detained for two hours, Paulus was taken to Siriwini Nabire Hospital because he had lost a great deal of blood and fainted, while Siluwanus was taken to the same hospital on the next day after he too fainted in the detention cell. After one week of treatment, both were allowed to go home and to receive outpatient medical treatment. There has been no investigation conducted into this case and the victims must bear the cost of their own medical treatment.
Video of an interview with Paulus Kobogau is available in Indonesian here.

Full U/A at 
http://www.humanrights.asia/news/urgent-appeals/AHRC-UAC-064-2014
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7) LITERACY RATE IN LANNY JAYA REGENCY INCREASES


Wamena, 1/5 (Jubi) – The local government’s efforts to improve the equity and quality of education in Lanny Jaya Regency has begun to yield results. The rise in the literacy rate and the Human Development Index are among the achievements of Lanny Jaya Regency.
About 36 of 100 school children could not read in 2011 but now the number decreased to 20 – 25.
“This achievement was obtained due to the hard work of the Local Government trough the Local Education and Learning Department with the support from the local community and other education components,” the Regional Secretary of Lanny Jaya, Christian Sohilait said in the event to celebrate the National Education Day on Wednesday (30/4).
Meanwhile the Head of the Education and Learning Department of Lanny Jaya Regency, Aletinus Yigibalom said the increase of the literacy rate in Lanny Jaya was attributed to the participation of the educational practitioners who were recruited in the Joint Program for the University’s Graduate to educate in the remote areas from the Universitas Negeri Medan, Universitas Riau and teachers from the Surya Institute, World Vision and other NGOs.
“We hoped our dream to become an education champion in the Papua Highland Area could be realized in 2016,” he said. (Jubi/Islami/rom)
(Visited 4 time, 4 visit today)
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8) KASUBDEN BRIMOB BIAK REPLACED AFTER SHOOTING INCIDENT BY A MEMBER OF BRIMOB

Jayapura, 1/5 (Jubi) – Papua police replaced Kasubden IV Pioneers Brimob Detachment C of Biak , Assistant Commissioner of Police , John Salmon Sabra with Assistant Commissioner of Police (AKP)Abner Ap, after the incident fight between a member of Biak Mobile Brigade Pioneers Detachment C , Brigadier ( Pol ) and a member of the Air Force ( AU ) from Battalion 468 Paskhas Sarotama, First Private Werdeni who shot dead a member of the Air Force in the head.
Adj Papua Police Mobile Brigade, Assistant Commissioner of Police, Mathius D Fakhiri said, the replacement of Kasubden IV Detachment C Pioneers Brimob is done on Wednesday ( 30/4).
“Previously, Abner Ap served as chairman of Telecommunications of Papua Police Mobile Brigade. This substitution process was done after a thorough evaluation of the incident. Fights between members of Brimob and the TNI AU occured at night market in Biak on Sunday ( 27/4),” Fakhiri said on Thursday (1/5).
“The perpetrator is now being handled Papua Police and will be processed as well in the general court, ” he said. (Jubi / Arjuna/Tina )

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