Wednesday, July 1, 2015

1) Filep Karma: Get Ourselves Ready for International Negotiation

2) Is President’s Letter Hindering Paniai Case Settlement?
3) Funds to Support Ad hoc Team Received by Komnas HAM in Papua
4) Special Committee of DPRP Supports Independent Student Forum
5) Low literacy rates hamper  Papua development
6) Analysis: Enhancing the  competitiveness of the  Papua region 


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1) Filep Karma: Get Ourselves Ready for International Negotiation
Jayapura, Jubi – Papuan political prisoner Filep Karma expressed gratitude to all parties for supporting West Papua in its campaign to obtain the observer status in the Melanesian Spearhead Group (MSG).
He praised God, Papuans, the people and governments of Vanuatu, Solomon Islands, Fiji, Papua New Guinea as well as the people of Kanak and their political leaders.
“I accept this recognition and send my gratitude to all parties and Papuan diplomats of the United Liberation Movement for West Papua (ULMWP) who have worked hard, and to my fellows in the forest and all prayers in the land of Papua and the people of Papua,” he said on Monday (29/6/2015).
He added the recognition of West Papua as an observer at the Melanesian Spearhead Group (MSG) was good for the grouping. “This achievement was an answer of my prayer along with the entire people of Papua. To my fellows who are now in Papua New Guinea, do not just stay in Port Moresby, you must split to every places in Fiji, Kanak and Solomon Islands”, he said.
He further said there must be a consolidation among all components to be integrated and collect some data on human right violations in Papua and revise it in preparing for international negotiations.
As earlier reported by Jubi, after accepting the status as observer, Octovianus Mote gave a speech in front of the MSG leaders that ULMWP leaders were elected by the Papuan people in the conference in June 2011 attended by the Indonesian Minister of Legal, Politic and Security Affairs in Jayapura. At that time, Mote said himself along with Leoni Tanggahma, Rex Rumakiek, Benny Wenda and the late John Ondowane were elected as representatives of Papuan people in the international forums. (Agus Pabika/rom)
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2) Is President’s Letter Hindering Paniai Case Settlement?
Jayapura, Jubi – The Papua branch of the National Human Right Commission said its efforts to resolve the Paniai case by setting up an ad hoc team are facing obstacles, including the president’s letter to the Indonesian Police and the Ministry of Legal, Political and Security Affairs instructing these institutions to form an investigation team on the shooting incident that killed four high school students and injured dozens of civilians on 8 December.
The acting chairman of the National Human Right Commission in Papua, Frits Ramandei, said the ad hoc team did not have forensic documents on dead victims and is facing funding problems.
“Actually, the National Human Right Commission has allocated the budget for the Ad Hoc team but their schedule to Papua is still arranged. Besides, the letter from president turned out to be a boomerang, because the Ministry of Legal, Politic and Security Affairs and Indonesian Police also formed an investigation team in referring to the letter as well as the National Human Right Commission. And these teams are not synchronized to work optimally,” Frits Ramandei told on Monday (29/6/2105).
According to him, the obstacle for getting a forensic document is autopsy. Moreover, the families and people refused an autopsy over the dead victims. “We hope everything goes well, so this case could be settled soon. There is a progress achieved by the National Human Right Commission by raising the status of Paniai investigation team to Ad Hoc team,” he said.
However, he concerned if the Indonesian Police conducted the investigation, the case would be brought to general crime discourse. If the perpetrator is the security forces member, he would take to the Military Court instead of the Human Right Court.
Meanwhile, the Secretary General of Student Independent Forum Melianus Duwitau similarly said until now there is no decree on the Ad Hoc team. The National Human Right Commission Papua Representative must push it since there are many other teams.
“I think if it would be directed to the Military Court instead of Human Right Court. It depends on how the National Human Right Papua Representative to provide support to push the decree on Ad Hoc team to start their work, because the reference is the Decree,” said Duwitau. (Arjuna Pademme/rom)

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3) Funds to Support Ad hoc Team Received by Komnas HAM in Papua

Jayapura, Jubi – Money collected by an Independent Student Forum (FIM) through public fundraising last week to support the ad hoc team investigating the Paniai case was handed over to the National Human Rights Commission (Komnas HAM) in Papua on Monday (29/06/15).
FIM chairman Teko Kogoya and several activists went to the office of Komnas HAM Papua, and handed Rp.608.000 to the acting chairman of Komnas HAM Papua, Frits Ramandei.
“We also hope that after receiving the money, ad hoc team led by Manager Nasution will go back in order to resolve shooting cases in Paniai,” Ramandei said.
“What has been done by FIM is a positive thing. However, if the money is given to the adhoc team, possibly it will put into state coffers to maintain the independence of the team. The action of fundraising has shown moral support for ad hoc team, and encourages all parties to work for Paniai case, “he said.
Earlier, Kogoya said it has raised funds in some places to help the National Human Rights Commission.
“What we did is to raise funds for helping the National Human Rights Commission and hope this country will provide budget for Paniai case . The fund collected will be handed to the office of Komnas HAM in Papua, “Teko Kogoya stated. (Arjuna Pademme/Tina)
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4) Special Committee of DPRP Supports Independent Student Forum
Jayapura, Jubi – The Special Committee of Papua Legislative Council (DPRP) on Human Rights has expressed support for the Independent Student Forum (FIM) to fundraising for raise funds for humanitarian purposes, and also to assist the National Human Rights Commission (Komnas HAM) to form ad hoc team in order to resolve the Paniai case.
“Due to financing constraints, the National Human Rights Commission is unable to form an ad hoc team in order to resolve the shooting case. I think what has been done by the FIM is to help the state, because the state did not provide funds to the National Human Rights Commission. But the more important is the Special Committee of DPRP supports the FIM in seeking justice for the victims and families of the victims, “chairman of DPRP on Human Rights, Laurenzus Kadepa said via telephone to the Jubi on Sunday (28/06/2015).
“We ask all institutions supporting FIM. Victims and their families hope that the case can be resolved justly,”he said.
Earlier, chairman of FIM, Teko Kogoya said it has raised funds in some places to help the National Human Rights Commission. However, the action did not last long because Jayapura city police disbanded. Even 14 FIM activists were interrogated by police during the 24-hour.
“What we did is to raise funds for helping the National Human Rights Commission and hope this country will provide budget for Paniai case . The money collected will be handed to the office of Komnas HAM in Papua, “Teko Kogoya stated. (Arjuna Pademme/ Tina)
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5) Low literacy rates hamper  Papua development
The Jakarta Post | Archipelago | Tue, June 30 2015, 4:50 PM -
The high rate of illiteracy in Papua’s two provinces has stalled development programs in the region, an official has said.
The head of Papua’s Family Welfare and People’s Empowerment Agency, Donatus Mote, said on Tuesday that the region’s medium-term development plan had faced difficulties caused by illiteracy among local officials.
This had led to the failure of many districts to submit their budget plans in relation to development programs, he said.
Of 4,788 villages in Papua, he said, only 14 villages had submitted their budget plans and were ready to start the government’s development programs.
“Those villages are all located in Jayapura,” Donatus said as quoted by tempo.co.
The latest data from the Education Ministry showed that Papua accounted for 36.31 percent of the nation’s illiterates, with 3.6 million people in 2013, the highest in the country.
To tackle the problem, Donatus said his agency had deployed 1,000 assistants to every district in Papua to help local officials compose their budgets.
Papuan legislator Tan Wei Long Karnan, meanwhile, has recommended that local officials must be, at a minimum, graduates of junior high school (SMP), as they are responsible for the distribution of a local budget worth up to Rp 3 billion (US$224,711) per year. (ika)(++++)

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6) Analysis: Enhancing the  competitiveness of the  Papua region 

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Mamay Sukaesih, Bahana, Jakarta | Business | Wed, July 01 2015, 10:04 AM -
At present, the focus of the government is shifting toward the development of the Eastern Indonesia Region, including the Papua region (Papua and West Papua). The development of Papua and West Papua provinces is one of the priorities listed in the 2015-2019 National Medium-Term Development Plan. 

The government has demonstrated its seriousness in building the infrastructure of Papua and West Papua provinces over the next five years by earmarking as many as 139 infrastructure projects (80 projects in Papua province and 59 projects in West Papua province), including the development of roads, sea ports, electrical power, railways, air transportation, energy, telecommunications and informatics. 

The contribution of Papua region’s gross regional domestic product (GRDP) to the national economy has decreased from 2.17 percent in 2010 to 1.8 percent in 2014. In detail, the contribution of Papua province’s GRDP to national gross domestic product (GDP) fell while that of West Papua rose slightly. This decline was caused by the economy in the Papua region being dominated by the mining sector, which has been struck by the current fall in global commodity prices. In Papua province, the mining sector enjoys a 29 percent share of GRDP. Similarly in West Papua, mining contributes 20.7 percent to GRDP while the oil and gas processing industry has a 30.1 percent share. Meanwhile, almost all districts or towns in the Papua region have a comparative advantage in natural resource-based sectors (agriculture, plantations, fisheries and mining). 

Economic growth in the Papua region is affected by movements in the prices of global commodities. As global commodity prices have declined, so too has economic growth in the province of Papua, from 14.8 percent year-on-year (yoy) in 2013 to 3.25 percent yoy in 2014. Likewise, economic growth in the province of West Papua decreased from 9.3 percent yoy in 2013 to 5.38 percent yoy in 2014. From a historical perspective, economic growth in West Papua (18 percent) was stronger than that in Papua province (5 percent) over the period from 2008-2013. The largest contribution to the economy in West Papua comes from the BP Tangguh project in Teluk Bintuni regency, while in the province of Papua that honor goes to PT Freeport in Mimika regency.

Besides mining, the economy of the Papua region is also dependent on government services. Government services drive the economy in almost all districts or towns in the Papua region. Based on GRDP by expenditure, the share of government spending toward total GRDP in the provinces of Papua and West Papua stands at approximately 31 percent and 20.3 percent respectively. This indicates that the Papua region has a high degree of dependence on funds from the state and regional budgets.

The Papua region is home to leading sectors based on natural resources as well as the general government services sector, sea and air transportation sectors. Leading sectors based on natural resources include forestry and oil and gas, especially petroleum and liquefied natural gas refining. Meanwhile, the mining and quarrying and fisheries sectors constitute base sectors in the Papua region but are growing more slowly than at the national level. The Papua region also plays host to sectors of potential that are not related to commodities. Such sectors enjoyed relatively high growth compared to that of the same sectors at the national level from 2008 to 2013, but do not yet qualify as base sectors. These include the following sectors: construction, livestock, wholesale and retail trade, hotels and restaurants, road transportation and river, lake and ferry transportation. 

Although the Papua region has great potential to be developed as an investment destination, the realization of investment plans in this area is still low. From 2010 to 2014, just 15 percent of the investment plans of foreign direct investment and domestic direct investment in West Papua were realized. Meanwhile, in Papua province the figure was 47 percent. These low figures are largely attributable to the various obstacles faced by investors in investing in the Papua region. 

Investment problems encountered in the Papua region include land issues, infrastructure, human resources or social culture and bureaucracy. The need for land acquisition conflicts with customary and indigenous land rights. The diversity of ethnic groups, languages and customs (there are more than 257 ethnic groups) makes it difficult to apply a uniform approach to acquiring land. Infrastructure in the Papua region, both in the form of basic infrastructure as well as available connectivity, is still inadequate, causing high logistics costs there. Moreover, the capacity of human resources in the provinces of Papua and West Papua is still low. Licensing services problems and an inept bureaucracy also serve as obstacles that tend to put off potential investors from placing their money in the Papua region.

The relatively low level of realization of investment plans in the Papua region is also linked to a lack of competitiveness in the region. Based on the 2014 to 2015 Mandiri Regional Competitiveness Index (MRCI), the province of West Papua ranks 30th and Papua province 31st out of 33 provinces. The MRCI is an index that depicts the holistic mapping of the macro-economy, human resources and employment, investment climate, infrastructure, institutions and government and financial institutions in every province in Indonesia. The index showed that the aspect in which West Papua was poorest in terms of competitiveness was investment climate, while for the province of Papua it was institutions and government. In comparison to the other provinces, in the Papua region almost all the aspects mentioned above ranked below the national average. 

In conclusion, the Papua region has great potential to be developed but development in that region is lower than other regions in Indonesia. To accelerate development in the Papua region, collaboration is needed among the central government, local government, the private sector (investors) and the local indigenous people (ethnic groups). 
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The writer is regional analyst at PT Bank Mandiri (Persero). - See more at: http://www.thejakartapost.com/news/2015/07/01/analysis-enhancing-competitiveness-papua-region.html#sthash.5HIHikYn.dpuf

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