Wednesday, July 22, 2015

1) Police to Name Suspects in Tolikara Arson Case: Chief

2) Police to name suspects  behind Tolikara riot
3) 4 Suspects in Tolikara Case: Police Chief
4) Suspect-Naming over Tolikara Incident Awaits Investigation Result
5) Armed Forces Not Accepting Blame on Tolikara Shooting
6) No Law Banning Religious Buidings in Tolikara

7) Supplies, medical assistance  reach Papua
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
1) Police to Name Suspects in Tolikara Arson Case: Chief
By Jakarta Globe on 02:15 pm Jul 22, 2015
Category CrimeHuman RightsNewsReligion



Security forces fired warning shots to disperse a crowd of about 200 after they disrupted an Islamic prayer meeting and attacked a mosque. (SP Photo/Robert Isodorus)


Jakarta. Police on Wednesday were set to charge several suspects linked to the torching of a mosque in Papua’s Tolikara district last week as officials rushed to contain the fallout of the incident and prevent violence from spreading elsewhere.
“Law enforcers have examined 30 witnesses. Today, there are five more witnesses [questioned]. After [all witnesses] are questioned, we will name the suspects,” National Police chief Gen. Badrodin Haiti told reporters on Wednesday.
The general however remained tight-lipped on when the announcement would be made.
Police earlier said “some individuals” had been provoking a group of around 200 people, pelting stones and setting fire to shops owned by Muslim migrants as local Muslims were absent from the area while taking part in a mass Idul Fitri prayer.
Almost 60 shops were destroyed in the flames, while 211 people were left homeless and a local mosque destroyed.
Badrodin said that police were investigating all claims surrounding the incident, including the spreading of flyers purportedly from the Evangelical Church of Indonesia (GIDI) — the largest religious group in the district — barring Muslims from performing Idul Fitri prayers en masse because the holiday coincided with a national conference held by GIDI.
GIDI has denied distributing the flyers and instead accused police of inciting the riot by firing at some GIDI youths “peacefully protesting” the use of loudspeakers in the mass prayer. A dozen people were shot by police in the incident, with one killed.
Badrodin said a team of experts from the National Police headquarters in Jakarta had been examining the flyers.
Police, he said, also investigated GIDI’s accusations of excessive use of force and determined members of the local precinct had followed “proper procedure” by firing warning shots into the air and then down to the ground to prevent protesters from advancing.
“But [these warning shots] were ignored,” he said.  “The investigation is still ongoing.”
Badrodin also defended Tolikara Police chief Adj. Sr. Comr. Suroso, who has been criticized for failing to prevent violence, with the threatening flyers being circulated up to a week before the incident.
“The district police chief has taken some measures. Once the flyers circulated he immediately confirmed it with GIDI president [the Rev. Dorman Wandikmbo]. The GIDI president said he never authorized it,” the general said.
Suroso also consulted the matter with Tolikara district chief Usman Wanimbo, who assured police that Muslims could still perform their mass prayers.
“Which is why [Suroso] confidently told the Muslim community: ‘go ahead with the prayer, I will keep you safe,’” Badrodin said.
Badrodin said he instructed all officers across the country to prevent violence from spreading as provocative messages continued to circulate in the aftermath of the incident.
A church in Purworejo district, Central Java, sustained minor damage after its front door was set on fire early on Tuesday. A threatening letter was left for its congregation.
Meanwhile, police in Jakarta were stepping up security to prevent Papuan students and churches from becoming a target of hate crimes, Jakarta Police chief Insp. Gen. Tito Karnavian said.

———————————————————————————-
2) Police to name suspects  behind Tolikara riot
thejakartapost.com | National | Wed, July 22 2015, 11:43 AM - 
The National Police said on Wednesday morning that they might announce the names of suspects behind a religious clash in Tolikara, Papua, on Wednesday.
“There is a possibility that we could determine the suspects today, hopefully,” National Police chief Gen. Badrodin Haiti said as quoted by kompas.com
Badrodin did not reveal further information about the possible suspects but asserted that the police would investigate the case thoroughly.
He said the police had questioned 31 witnesses in the case and that they planned to question five more today.
Some of the witnesses are members of the Evangelical Church of Indonesia (GIDI), while the rest are Muslims who performed Idul Fitri prayers at the subdistrict military command (Koramil) field in Tolikara.
“We hope to find a clue to solve this case,” Badrodin said.
He also rebuffed allegations of foreign intervention in this case.
A riot occurred in Tolikara last Thursday between Muslims and Christians that led to the destruction of several kiosks. One person died in the incident while several others were injured.
The riot started after people, thought to be members of GIDI, threw rocks at those performing Idul Fitri prayers. (ika)(++++)
——————————————————————————————-
WEDNESDAY, 22 JULY, 2015 | 13:10 WIB
3) 4 Suspects in Tolikara Case: Police Chief

TEMPO.COJakarta- National Police Chief General Badrodin Haiti said on Wednesday, July 22, 2015, that the police has named four suspects in the recent unrest in Karubaga, Tolikara, Papua. All the suspects are being examined in the Papua Regional Police.
“I cannot give out the names. [I will announce it] later after the examination process,” he said at the Attorney General’s Office on Wednesday.
Badrodin said the police were still checking out dozens of witnesses from various groups to get light to triggered the incident. He said the most important thing now is to cool the situation and prevent similar incidents from recurring in in other areas.
"I have ordered all ranks of local police to coordinate with Muslim and non-Muslim religious leaders, especially Islamic community organizations," said Badrodin.
"The important thing is to handle this case with a cool head, not emotionally. Trust the police in handling the case so, we don’t aggravate the situation ... Because this is the first time this [kind of incident] happened."
The clash occurred on Friday morning, July 17, 2015, when dozens of suspected members of the congregation of the Evangelical Church in Indonesia (GIDI) protested Eid prayers at the local military command field in Karubaga. They said they had informed the authorities against the use of loudspeakers, because it coincided with a GIDI seminar.
Policemen issued warning shots to ward off protesters. But mass rampage, caused the burning of dozens of stalls and a prayer room around the field. One victim was killed and dozens of others injured from the police shooting.
REZA ADITYA
———————————————————————————
WEDNESDAY, 22 JULY, 2015 | 12:50 WIB
4) Suspect-Naming over Tolikara Incident Awaits Investigation Result

TEMPO.COJakarta - National Police chief Gen. Badrodin Haiti said the decision to name circular letter issuers allegedly causing incident in Tolikara as suspects would await for investigation results.
“We can’t make accusations without strong evidence,” Badrodin said at National Police Headquarter on Wednesday, July 22, 2015.
Bardodin confirmed that the investigation would relate the incident that claimed one life to the circular letter issuers. However, Badrodin said that police would not immediately conclude that the incident was caused by the circular letter signed by Tolikara branch of Evangelical Church of Indonesia’s (GIDI) Secretary Rev. Marthen Jingga and Tolikara branch of GIDI chairman Rev. Nayus Wenda.
Both reverends had confirmed that they issued the circular letter on July 11, 2015. According to Marthen, the letter was addressed to all Muslims in Tolikara Regency with copies sent to Tolikara regent Usman G. Wanimbo, Tolikara Precinct Police chief Suroso, Tolikara Legislative Council chairman and Tolikara Military Commander.
Marthen confirmed that the letter contained bans for Muslims to perform Eid prayer.
“But we don’t know who disseminated it and how it was disseminated,” Marthen told Tempo on Tuesday, July 21, 2015.
According to Badrodin, the circular letter was not the only cause that sparked the incident, but also topics in GIDI’s seminar discussion and the issuance of regional regulation.
“We’re still waiting for the copy of the regional regulation,” Badrodin said.
 
MOYANG KASIH DEWIMERDEKA | MARIA RITA HASUGIAN

————————————————————————————-


5) Armed Forces Not Accepting Blame on Tolikara Shooting
WEDNESDAY, 22 JULY, 2015 | 14:50 WIB
TEMPO.COJakarta - Head of Information of the Indonesian Armed Forces Major General Fuad Basya on Wednesday, July 22, 2015, asks for fair view of last week’s unrest in Papua that had claimed one life and rejected opinions that the army should be held responsible.  
It is not clear whether the fatal shooting originated from the army or police personnel who were both securing the location during the incident.
Fuad requested the police to reveal not only who got shot and who did the shooting but also the reason behind the shooting. He believed that there must be a pressing reason for his personnel to raise arms.
“The situation at the time was there are hundreds of people attacking, that was why the soldiers raised arms,” he said, adding that there are rules not shoot directly at people.
The clash occurred on Friday morning, July 17, 2015, when dozens of suspected members of the congregation of the Evangelical Church in Indonesia (GIDI) protested Eid prayers at the local military command field in Karubaga. They said they had informed the authorities against the use of loudspeakers, because it coincided with a GIDI seminar.
Policemen issued warning shots to ward off protesters. But mass rampage, caused the burning of dozens of stalls and a prayer room around the field. One victim was killed and dozens of others injured from the police shooting.
MOYANG KASIH DEWIMERDEKA
—————————————————————————————

WEDNESDAY, 22 JULY, 2015 | 15:30 WIB
6) No Law Banning Religious Buidings in Tolikara

TEMPO.COJakarta - Home Affairs Minister Tjahjo Kumolo said that the Tolikara regent and Legislative Council could not provide physical evidences related to the existence of a regional regulation banning praying house buildings in the regency. However, the Tolikara regent confirmed that the regulation was enforced in Tolikara.
"I waited yesterday, and I told them to find it. They said that it was drafted by the previous government. The regent and the Legislative Council said that they didn’t know about it, but we keep on looking," Tjahjo said at the State Palace on Wednesday, July 22, 2015.
According to Tjahjo, he could not find any record related to the regional regulation at his ministry. Tjahjo added that the regional regulation was not found in 139 canceled ones.
Under the Law on Regional Governments, any regional bills passed by Legislative Councils and regional heads must be submitted to the central government within seven days after it is signed.
Soedarmo, the director general for politics and general administrations at the Home Affaris Ministry, said that the regional regulation was proposed by the president of the Evangelical Church of Indonesia (GIDI) to Tolikara Regent.
Later, the proposal was discussed by the regent and the Legislative Council to be passed. However, the central government had never received it to be verified. When a regional regulation violates human rights or the superseding Laws, the central government will ask a regional government to revise the bill.
"If [the regional regulation] does exist, it clearly violates human rights and Pancasila (five principles)," Soedarmo said.
Soedarmo revealed that Tolikara regent accommodated GIDI’s proposal because he was a member of the organization. Soedarmo added that GIDI was very dominant in Tolikara.
Under the regional regulation, GIDI issued a circular letter on July 11, 2015 banning Muslims to perform Eid prayer and wear hijab in Tolikara. Earlier, the letter caused an incident during the Idul Fitri.
TIKA PRIMANDARI


————————————————————————————
7) Supplies, medical assistance  reach Papua
Nethy Dharma Somba, The Jakarta Post, Jayapura | Archipelago | Wed, July 22 2015, 8:29 AM - 

The Lanny Jaya regional administration in Papua said it had distributed enough food supplies to help thousands of residents in three districts survive a food crisis after a recent series of hailstorms hit the area and caused massive harvest failures.

“All villages in the three districts have received food supplies. We have dropped seven tons of rice into the affected areas using a small aircraft,” Lanny Jaya Regent Befa Jigibalom told The Jakarta Post on Tuesday.

A series of hailstorms hit 26 villages in the Kuyawage, Goa Baliem and West Wano districts from July 5 to 7, damaging residents’ plants, including potatoes, tubers and vegetables, as they became covered by frost.

Local authorities also reported that 11 residents had died after the air temperature dropped to minus 2 degrees Celsius during the hailstorms. 

Befa said that apart from rice and other food supplies, the regency administration had also sent medical assistance teams to monitor the health of residents in the affected areas.

“The teams have been deployed to the affected villages to help those who need medical treatment,” he said.

At least 1,200 families live in the three isolated districts, which can only be reached by small aircraft or by walking for two days from the regency’s capital city of Tiom.

Befa said that such hailstorms usually occurred every five years. However, the last time this natural phenomenon hit the areas was 10 years ago. 

The phenomenon, he added, was considered unique because the hail that fell at night would melt in the morning, but the oil-like liquid left on leaves and trees would make the exposed plants wither and die.

“The phenomenon could lead to famine, as all plants will die and it will take months for the local residents to replant,” said Befa.

In the past, he said, people whose regions suffered from hailstorms would flee to other regions or have their food supplied from other areas.

Similar hailstorms also hit several districts in the neighboring Puncak and Nduga regencies earlier this month, leaving thousands of local residents struggling with a food crisis.

On Tuesday, Social Affairs Minister Khofifah Indar Parawansa visited Timika, Papua, to hand over aid to the three affected regencies. 

The aid, which includes, among other things, 15 tons of rice, 600 blankets and 600 boxes of instant noodles, were officially received by the head of the Papua Social Affairs Agency, Ribka Haluk.

The head of the Puncak Social Affairs Agency, Juliana Kelay, made assurances that all regions recently hit by the hailstorms had received the necessary aid.

“There is no need to worry that residents in the affected villages will be experiencing famine,” Juliana told the Post.

On Wednesday, Khofifah is scheduled to visit Agandugume district in the Puncak regency, one of the districts worst hit by the hailstorms. 

“She was initially scheduled to fly today [Tuesday], but cancelled because of bad weather,” Juliana said, adding that it was also because of bad weather that the aid had to be handed over in Timika.

Like the three isolated districts in Lanny Jaya, the Agandugume district is located at between 2,300 and 2,500 meters above sea level and can only be reached by small aircraft. The district is situated just below the 4,884-meter Puncak Jaya Mountain, one of the world’s seven tallest summits. - 
———————————————————-

No comments:

Post a Comment