Wednesday, August 10, 2016

1) Displaced Timika Residents Hit By Disease Outbreak


2) NATIVE PAPUANS FACE CHALLENGES AS THEY MARK WORLD INDIGENOUS PEOPLE’S DAY
3) PAPUA FIFTH IN REGIONAL FUNDS DEPOSITS IN BANKS
4) Freeport`s Export License Extended until 2017

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http://tabloidjubi.com/eng/displaced-timika-residents-hit-by-disease-outbreak/

1) Displaced Timika Residents Hit By Disease Outbreak


Sentani, Jubi – Some of about 327 people displaced by recent violence in Timika, Mimika have suffered from diseases in their temporary shelters in Jayapura Regency.
Refugee Coordinator Johny Wonda told Jubi in Sentani on Sunday (7/8/2016) that many of the displaced showed symptoms of diseases such as diarrhea, fever, nausea, and respiratory infection.
The displace people have not received adequate health care even after the media highlighted their plight, Wonda said.
One of the displaced,  Mina Kogoya, 35, said her three months daughter Ria Lambe have been suffering from ulcers and fever since last week.
Another refugee, Pitina Wenda, similarly said his four-year old son Fiktor Kogoya was also ill.
“He’s had diarrhea for three days and refused to eat,” she said.
Volunteer for Timikia refugees Jemi Tabuni said among the sickening refugees, he helped to care 55, about 4 to 6 babies and 7 children. The rest is teenagers and adults.
“These people were just here when the nurse was coming,” he said.
He admitted the doctor has examined the patients on Monday afternoon (8/8/2016) but some would be continued to examine on Tuesday (9/8/2016) because the doctor already left.
By phone, Nurse Alfa Rumbino said she was treating the patients at Palomo. “From the examination, many of them are getting the repertory infection, diarrhea, cough, and flu, and most of them are adults and elderlies,” she said. (Yance Wenda/rom)
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2) NATIVE PAPUANS FACE CHALLENGES AS THEY MARK WORLD INDIGENOUS PEOPLE’S DAY
9 August 2016
Jayapura, Jubi – Land rights, self-determination and autonomy have become urgent issues for indigenous peoples in the world, including Indonesia, said the Chairman of Management Board Pusaka Foundation Elimianus Ola Kleden Monday (8/8/2016) in remarks to commemorate the 22nd World Indigenous People’s Day.
Kleden told Jubi that Papuan people meet the criteria of indigenous people according to international law.
“However, there are two main challenges, namely its status as an Indonesian province and internal consolidation, in particular in determining the political will,” said Kleden, who for decades has worked on the issues of indigenous people.
As a province in Indonesia, he said, Papua’s struggle should often ‘be adjusted’ to its status as a part Indonesia. “If not, they would get many accusations,” he said.
It has close relation with the second challenge, which the issue of Papua indigenous people is always confronting with the political issue, so the attempt to enforce the rights, which is actually the right of citizens, is potentially differentiating as the issue of separatism. “People are willing to demand their right in development, always have fear to be accused as the OPM,” he said.
Meanwhile, he added, the sentiment among tribes and regions in Papua remains strong, it has made the issue of indigenous people in a region is likely to be seen as very limited. But the Melanesian identity could be a bridge. “In my opinion, it has been tried through the Melanesian issue,” he said.
When asked related to the struggle of the indigenous people in the world today, he said the UN Declaration on the Indigenous People Rights (UNDRIP) 2007 that adopted by 144 countries as well as the COP (Conference of Parties) is the most significant progress. “I think UNDRIP is the most progressive. In addition, there are agreements in several meetings of the COP, related to the climate or biodiversity, have made the issue of people’s participation and indigenous people’s rights getting stronger,” he said.
In the separate place, the Secretary General of Aliansi Masyarakat Adat Nusantata (AMAN/Alliance for Indigenous People in Indonesia) Abdon Nababan in the written statement to Jubi (8/8) said the rights for education, culture and spiritual are guaranteed by UN Declaration about the Indigenous People’s Rights.
According to him, the importance of education for recognition and protection of the indigenous people is currently voiced by indigenous people of the world in the commemoration of the World Indigenous People’s Day this year that always celebrated every 9 August.
For the reason, AMAN held a week of the Indonesian Indigenous People with the theme of ‘Education, Culture and Spirituality of the Indigenous People’.
This activity, he said, would be held by the Directorate of Faith and Tradition, Directorate General of Culture, Ministry of Education and Culture in collaboration with AMAN. Deputy II AMAN, Rukka Sombolinggi and the Director General of Culture of the Ministry of Education and Culture Hilmar Farid are scheduled to speak in the event.
“The joint celebration with the Ministry of Education and Culture is a major advancement for Indonesians, because this is for the first the ministry was involved. The theme chosen also indicates the state recognition towards the cultural spirituality of the indigenous people that was there long time before the Republic was founded,” he said. (*/rom)
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3) PAPUA FIFTH IN REGIONAL FUNDS DEPOSITS IN BANKS
9 AUGUST 2016

Jayapura, Jubi – Papua Province is in the fifth largest recipient of bank deposits, with total funds deposited amounting to Rp 2.59 trillion rupiah.
Assistant for Economic and People’s Welfare Elia Loupatty on Monday (8/8/2016) in Jayapura said it was happened not on purpose, but more often because of the most partners worked with the provincial government asked the payment made after the completion of works.
“It’s not a mistake or deliberately hold the funds, but most of these partners asked for payment after they finished the job, so it gave impression as if there’s a buildup,” he said.
On the other hand, he said, the low absorption of Papua Regional Budget has indicated that the partners or the third parties who handle the projects in Papua have their own funds to build the government projects. “We should admit that our partners are firm, because they are capable to run the project with their own resources,” he said. (*/rom)

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WEDNESDAY, 10 AUGUST, 2016 | 14:50 WIB
4) Freeport`s Export License Extended until 2017

TEMPO.COJakarta- The Energy and Mineral Resources Ministry issued a recommendation letter approving Freeport Indonesia to export copper concentrates. The recommendation will be used by the US miner to request an export approval letter from the Trade Ministry.
Director General of Mineral and Coal Bambang Gatot Ariyono told Tempo on Tuesday, August 9, 2016, that Freeport also received an additional export quota to 1.4 million tons.
The recommendation letter is valid for five months until January 11, 2017. The concentrate export ban will begin the day after or on January 12, 2017.
Freeport's management was unable to confirm the report. "I have not checked it," the company's spokesman Riza Pratama said.
Meanwhile, House of Representatives' (DPR) Energy Commission member Satya Widya Yudha said that Freeport's export extension is against regulations. The Mining Law stipulates that a miner may not export concentrates without having first built a smelter. Freeport's smelter construction progress is stalled at 14%. 
Satya said that a government regulation in lieu of the Mining Law is issued first, considering the Mining Law revision is not likely to be completed this year.
A similar sentiment came from law mining expert Ahmad Redi, who suggested the government to lobby the DPR to revise articles about the smelter mandate. 
"When an export permit is given, the national regulations are violated. Not only the Mining Law but the Energy Minister's Regulation is broken by giving an export license until February 2017," Redi said Redi.
Meanwhile, the Indonesian Mining Association's chairman Ido Hutabarat said that not renewing Freeport's export license would cause financial troubles to the miner.
"We are just looking from the commercial point of view. Without an export license, Freeport will have fewer or no sales at all." 
Ido asked the government to stop permitting export based on smelter-building progress because Freeport's smelter construction will not run smoothly without certainties about their contract. The fate of Freeport's activities in Papua will be decided in 2019 or two years before its contract expires.
ROBBY IRFANY | ALI HIDAYAT

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