Sunday, January 14, 2018

1) Palm Oil Association Urges Gov't to Revive Suharto-Era Transmigration Program


2) UNCEN JOURNAL OF ANTHROPOLOGY USED TO ATTRACT INTERNATIONAL CUSTOMERS

3) 24 HOUSES WERE BURIED BY LANDSLIDES IN YAHUKIMO


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1) Palm Oil Association Urges Gov't to Revive Suharto-Era Transmigration Program
By : Muhamad Al Azhari | on 6:41 PM January 14, 2018





The Indonesian Palm Oil Association, or Gapki, urged the government to revive its now defunct transmigration program, which was first implemented under former President Suharto, to empower rural farmers and enrich palm oil producing regions. (Reuters Photo/Samsul Said)


Jakarta. The Indonesian Palm Oil Association, or Gapki, urged the government to revive its now defunct transmigration program, first implemented under former President Suharto, to empower rural farmers and enrich palm oil producing regions.
Gapki secretary general Togar Sitanggang said in a statement on Friday (12/01) that the government's transmigration program made a significant contribution to the nation’s development as it helped open up isolated areas and successfully enriched workers in rural areas through improved resource exploitation.
In the 1980s and 1990s, many Balinese and Javanese workers moved to rural areas in remote locations in Kalimantan, Sumatra and Papua to cultivate land and extract natural resources under the transmigration program.
Togar, who spoke at a discussion session in Jakarta last week, said that many isolated regions have been able expand their administrative status to "regency" thanks to increased population growth and economic activity due to the program.
Many of these so-called transmigrants managed to find work as palm oil farmers, helping to stimulate local economies and create new settlements and towns.
The program continued into the 2000s, though the central government later turned its focus on local transmigration to better reallocate labor within regions.
Indonesia is the world’s largest palm oil producer. According to Gapki data, about 50 million Indonesians in their everyday lives depend on palm oil and its derivatives, be it directly or indirectly.
In 2016, the sector brought $18.6 billion in foreign exchange revenue.
The administration of President Joko "Jokowi" Widodo has signaled that it is paying serious attention to the sector, although there is no stated goal to revive the decades-long transmigration program. The current administration is focused on increasing plantation productivity and strengthening the role of smallholder farmers.
Coordinating Economic Affairs Minister Darmin Nasution said at a palm oil conference last year that boosting palm oil plantation productivity and improving farmers' welfare are integral parts of the government's agrarian reform initiative. This is aimed at narrowing wealth disparity through better land utilization and redistribution.
Jokowi initiated a replanting program by planting oil palm trees with high-quality seeds for more productive crops in plantation areas owned by smallholder farmers in Banyuasin, South Sumatra, in October.

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2) UNCEN JOURNAL OF ANTHROPOLOGY USED TO ATTRACT INTERNATIONAL CUSTOMERS

Jayapura, Jubi – Journal of anthropology in Social and Political faculty (FISIP) of UNCEN used to attract international customers with up to 800 academicians from home and abroad. The journal focuses on publishing the results of anthropological research.
“The magazine has customers from various international institutions and persons up to 800 and comes from various countries in the world,” said a senior lecturer of Anthropology Cendrawasih University, Johsz Manzoben, recently.
Johsz Mansoben said the research has its own advantages for anthropological institutions. Many research authors came from various countries in the fields of anthropology, linguistics, health education, archeology and botany.

The first anthropological research activity was conducted since the establishment of the institution in 1963 until 1974. Recorded research conducted by the well known anthropologist, Prof. Koentjaraningrat, was about the Cultures of Bonggo People, especially their kinship system. The results of his research were published in international journal.
Prof. Dr. Parsudi Suparlan examines the culture of Arso people, and has been published in Bulletin of Irian Jaya Development. Drs. Anwas Iskandar also conducted research on Mukoku People and has been published as a book.
Joshz mentioned further researches have also conducted by a number of anthropologists such as Prof. Dr. M.T Walker from 1972 to 1974 about Fishing Industry in Jayapura: Market Resources in Jayapura; Copra Industri in Raja Ampat, Sorong; Economic and Social Change among the Asmats (in Asmat papers Volume I; Social structure and Leadership among the asmat (asmat paper volume II).
“Professor Walker conducted research in Asmat for a year, we were invited to stay for a year there to conduct the research and live together with community,” he said.
He hopes the anniversary of Anthropology Department will be set as regular agenda to be commemorated every year.
Acting Head of Anthropology Department FISIP UNCEN, Marlin Falssy said a lot of research has been done by lecturers, students, and anthropology alumni. “But the results publication were still lacking,” she said.
Currently the agency has a journal managed by Jack Morin, though it is not regularly published due to financial constraints. “There have been lot of things we had conducted and today we are reviewing the works to improve this department,” he said. (tabloidjubi.com)
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3) 24 HOUSES WERE BURIED BY LANDSLIDES IN YAHUKIMO

Yahukimo, Jubi – Landslide disaster has struck the residents settlements and farms of in Buahun village Kabianggama District, Yahukimo Regency end of last year (December 30), at about three o’clock in the afternoon.
According to Enius Yual, a person in charge in handling landslide disaster in village Buahun, Kabianggama district, it occurred because Bibil Mountain was split in the middle that caused a shift of lands and landslides. As a result, dozens of houses and farms owned by residents were damaged and dozens of livestock died.
“There are 24 houses buried in landslides. Farms owned by residents in six villages, including Buahun, Bahabolma, Kawianggema, Soha, Supayo, and Domul villages, destroyed completely due to landslides in three locations. Total of 26 pigs also buried by landslides. Now people started to get coughing, fever chills, runny nose, and shortness of breath. Food also lacks and we ask government’s attention,” said Enius Yual to Jubi, in 
Dekai, Thursday (January 11).

“This disaster is a fact, not we need help from the government,” he added.
Chief of Kabianggema District, Agus Silip, who also witnesses said the disaster had happened almost two weeks ago, but the information were late to be delivered due to transportation which is only by plane. He just arrived in Deka, the regency capital, to bring evidence of disaster.
“Our house, farms, and pig are buried. Our house was ruined. Our essentials and kitchen appliances were covered by landslides. We started to get sick. We desperately need help from all parties. We’ve got nothing else,” said Silip.
He told Jubi that the disaster came in a suddenly. There was no earthquake, rain, or any other signs. Residents were in a state of shock and panic trying to save themselves.
“The news about the tragedy is delayed because of it happened in the hinterland. The means of communication are limited. Just today I met reporters,” he said.(tabloidjubi.com)
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