Friday, July 6, 2018

1) TPN-PB: West Papua’s independence is not a gift from the sky


2) Solpap asks the 4th floor of Pasar Mama-Mama Building is open for children learning centre

3) Indonesia is a good friend in the making

4) Papuan Armed Group Terror Caused Nduga Residents Leave to Timika

5) Police and Amnesty International have different perceptions

6) Papua Provincial Government allocates Rp 21.3 billion for religious institutions
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1) TPN-PB: West Papua’s independence is not a gift from the sky

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TPN-PB / OPM Paniai Region before the ceremony of 1 July 2018 – Jubi / IST

Paniai, Jubi – Damianus Magai Yogi, the leader of the West Papua National Liberation Army (TPN-PB) of Meepago Region, in his speech during the 47th Anniversary of Free Papua Movement, asserted a series of violence over West Papuans should terminate by resistance against the colonialism in Papua territory.
“Independence doesn’t come down from the sky nor doesn’t come from abroad or freely given from Indonesia, but we have to fight for it,” he said in front of thousands of people who participated in the day commemoration on Sunday (1/7/2018).

Meanwhile, Charles Magai Yogi, TPN-PB Adviser of Paniai Region added that Free Papua Movement was established in 1965 to terminate the occupation of the Indonesian Government in Papua that formerly known as Irian Jaya.
“Thank the people of West Papua, in particular, the guerrillas who fought for their homeland and still hold this struggle for independence. Keep fighting, because freedom is the right of all nations on this earth,” he said.
The proclamation of 1 July 1971 is a manifestation of people’s protest against the international community over dishonest AFC. “The Rome Treaty and New York Agreement are the international acts against the rights and sovereignty of West Papuans which has been supported by the United Nations Charter and the Atlantic Chapter for self-determination,” he said. (*)
Reporter: Abeth You
Editor: Pipit Maizier

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2) Solpap asks the 4th floor of Pasar Mama-Mama Building is open for children learning centre
Published 19 hours ago on 6 July 2018 By admin


Volunteers teach children at the 3rd floor of Pasar Mama-Mama Building. – Jubi / Hengky Yeimo
Jayapura, Jubi – Naomi Zaelan, the coordinator of Children Learning Center of Solpap (Papuan Traders Solidarity) and Komunitas Jantung Kota said the 4th floor of Pasar Mama-Mama Papua Building must return to the Solpap management.
It ‘s not only because Solpap assists the traditional women traders, but it also fosters their children during their mothers’ activities in the market.
“I’ve been handling the street children for ten years, and they studied at the old market. Now the learning process is taking place on the 3rd floor of the new market, but unfortunately, it is the place where their mothers must sell their commodities. So we ask the government to open the 4th floor both for the Solpap office and children learning centre,” Zaelan told Jubi on Tuesday (07/03/2010).
Further, she explained that currently, the learning centre has children of age groups of 3-16 years. “We have ten classes and twenty voluntary teachers who recruited from the church and other institutions,” she said.
Meanwhile, the Chairman of Solpap Frengky Warer said until now the 4th-floor sealed by BUMN (State-Owned Enterprise) and Judith Diponegoro from Pokja (Working Group) Papua. “Why the BUMN and Pokja Papua did it is entirely unclear. This building is obviously for Pasar Mama-Mama Papua and handed over to the Jayapura Municipal Government, not to the BUMN,” he said. (*)
 
Reporter: Hengky Yeimo
Editor: Pipit Maizer

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3) Indonesia is a good friend in the making

  • The Australian



The arithmetic is clear: if Indonesia can keep growing at about 5 per cent a year for the next two or three decades, as it has done so far this century, it will become the world’s fifth-largest economy by 2040, and the fourth-largest by 2050; in sheer economic weight it will come in behind only China, India and the US. 
Already by 2030 — when Australia’s new submarines may just be starting to enter service — its GDP will be three times Australia’s, and almost as big as Japan’s. Wealth is the ultimate foundation of national power, so that will make Indonesia, or should make Indonesia, a very powerful country. It will have the material resources to be a great power in Asia, able to exercise major influence over affairs not just in its immediate neighbourhood but also throughout our region. And it has the potential to be far more important to Australia than we have ever conceived.
It may even become as important to us as China, because while it will not match China’s wealth and power, it is much closer — and that could make all the difference. Never underestimate the importance of proximity.
And yet nothing about Indonesia today presages this. It hardly seems a country poised to become a great power and an arbiter of strategic affairs. On the contrary, it appears to be drifting along pretty much as it has for decades: a large, diverse, complex, self-absorbed and rather shambolic nation that still punches way below its weight on the regional stage, and barely registers globally.
It seems little able to make sense of the power it is steadily accruing as its economy grows, or of how to use this power. Here, then, is the paradox of Indonesia’s position in Asia today: economic growth is driving it towards a position of political and economic influence that it seems both uninterested in and incapable of exploiting.
To some in Australia this may sound like good news. The argument goes that the less Indonesia can turn its increasing economic weight into effective strategic power, the better. That’s understandable, because we have got used to thinking that we have more to fear than to hope for from our large neighbour.
For much of the 75 years since it emerged, rather unexpectedly, as a vast new state on our doorstep, Indonesia has appeared more as a liability than an asset on Australia’s strategic balance sheet.
At first, Sukarno’s unsettling brand of assertive nationalism raised credible fears both that Indonesia could threaten us directly and that it could offer more distant hostile powers access to territory close to our shores. It mostly looked a lot less threatening under Suharto’s New Order, which lasted from 1967 to 1998, but the potential for conflict never disappeared.
Indeed, after Australia’s retreat from Vietnam and until very recently, the possibility of conflict with Indonesia remained the principal focus of our defence policy, even though — despite recurring tensions over East Timor and West Papua — the risk has mostly been very remote.
Moreover, this perception of Indonesia as a potential danger has not been offset by any real sense that it could also be a major strategic asset to Australia, helping to shield us from more distant threats. That is because we have been so confident such threats could not arise while the US continued to exercise clear and uncontested strategic leadership in Asia; it has been easy to overlook Indonesia’s potential to help defend us as long as America’s power, which has kept the region so stable and peaceful for so long, seemed unassailable.
Some have long understood Indonesia’s potential as a strategic asset for Australia. As the Dibb review, a survey of Australia’s defence capacities, put it back in 1986, Indonesia “forms a protective barrier to Australia’s northern approaches”; the review emphasised our shared interest in keeping our neighbourhood “free from interference by potentially hostile external powers”. This reflects the simple fact that just as Indonesia is the only close neighbour strong enough to pose any serious threat to us, so too is it the only one strong enough to help us resist the intrusion of a potential adversary to within striking range of our shores.
And proximity means the two countries’ interests naturally align: a threat to one by a major external power must also threaten the other. This does not guarantee that Australia’s and Indonesia’s interests and objectives will always coincide in the face of a threat from outside our shared neighbourhood, but it does mean that such alignment is inherently more likely for Australia than with any other Asian major or middle power. Just as our closeness with Indonesia gives us many reasons or pretexts to be enemies, it also gives as many reasons to become allies. And this means that Indonesia’s growing power can be both good and bad news for Australia, making it both a more valuable potential ally and a more dangerous potential adversary.
But its potential as an ally is swiftly becoming more important to us as the wider order in Asia shifts. While the US remained the region’s dominant power we had nothing to fear from any state except Indonesia, but now we face a very different region in which America’s position is much weaker while China’s, in particular, is much stronger.
The central challenge for Australia’s foreign policy in the decades ahead will be to manage China’s growing power and influence, and to prevent it becoming a threat to us while maximising our independence and freedom of manoeuvre. Indonesia could be a critical ally for us in achieving that goal, quite possibly the most important ally we would have.
And the more powerful it becomes and the more effectively it learns to use its power, the more help to us it can be. So while we can never ignore Indonesia’s potential as a threat, its potential as an ally is more important to us now than it has ever been, and will become more important still over the decades ahead. That means we in Australia should hope that it can indeed realise its potential as a major power, and make sense of that power to use it effectively.
And it means we need to understand much better than we do now how likely that is to happen, and how events will unfold if it does.
Hugh White is professor of strategic studies at the Australian National University. This is an edited extract from his essay The Jakarta Switch, from Australian Foreign Affairs 3 — Australia & Indonesia, on sale from Monday.
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4) Papuan Armed Group Terror Caused Nduga Residents Leave to Timika

TEMPO.COTimika - More evacuees from Kenyam, Nduga District, Papua were coming to the nearest region Agats, Asmat District. The number of refugees was gradually increased following recent terrors from Papua armed group.
Asmat Social Agency Amir Makhmud said as many as 116 Kenyam residents stayed at the agency’s rental house, the Evangelical Christian Church, and Tongkonan Traditional House of Toraja Asmat Family Association.
“As many as 66 evacuees are non-Papuan residents and now live at Tongkonan Traditional House of Agats, while 50 are Papuans living at the rental house at Jl. Amborep Agats,” said Amir, as quoted from Antara today, July 6.

Amir predicted more Kenyam residents would seek refuge to Agats for the next few days. The evacuees planned to return to their homeland on July 11, using Pelni KM Leuser ship that departed from Agats Asmat Port to Paumako Port, Timika.
Earlier on Sunday, July 1, as many as 45 people using KM Tatamailau boat from Agats, Asmat arrived in Timika, followed by 106 evacuees on Wednesday, July 4. Asmat Provincial Administration allocated some Rp162 million to facilitate the boat ticket for the evacuees to Timika, Papua.
ANTARA
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http://tabloidjubi.com/eng/police-and-amnesty-international-have-different-perceptions/


5) Police and Amnesty International have different perceptions



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Jayapura, Jubi – Papua Police Chief, the Inspector General Boy Rafli Amar said the police and the Amnesty International (AI) have different perceptions over the report that said the police and military committed extrajudicial killing of 95 indigenous Papuans over the past eight years.
“Their mission is different from ours. The Police are not killing people but doing their duty. The world ‘kill” must be related to its context,” said Amar on Wednesday (4/7/2018).
Further, he said the Police also lost many of their officers who were shot and died during their duties. If officers on duty raise their guns in the scene then arise causalities, it should not consider as killing people. “The Police have a standard operating procedure in using the firearms. So it’s surely seen objectively. It is not the police come to take the lives of the people, not like that,” he said.
The Police, continued the chief, have never protected officers who found guilty. For instance, if they involved in a criminal case, they would be prosecuted according to the law. “What the Amnesty International said is tendentious, because both of us have different understanding and vision over this situation,” he said. (*)
 
Reporter: Arjuna Pademme
Editor: Pipit Maizier
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6) Papua Provincial Government allocates Rp 21.3 billion for religious institutions






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Jayapura, Jubi – Papua Provincial Government through Public Welfare Bureau allocates Rp 21.3 billion from the autonomy fund for 47 religious institutions in 2018.
The Head of Papua Public Welfare Bureau Naftali Yogi said the amount is higher than it was in the previous year, which was only Rp 21.7 billion. “Last June we have signed a MoU with 47 religious institutions who are now waiting for the disbursement process,” Yogi told reporters in Jayapura on Wednesday (4/7/2018).
For the disbursement process, he said the bureau has coordinated with the Regional Financial and Asset Management Board of Papua. “So, this year the religious aid will be transferred to the religious institutions at once to support the religious activities programs from lacking funds,” he said.
Meanwhile, Papua Regional Secretary Hery Dosinaen said the provincial government gives their full trust to the religious institutions, so they better manage these funds correctly. “They must keep and well manage this trust,” said Dosinaen. (*)
 
Reporter: Alexander Loen
Editor: Pipit Maizier
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