Monday, July 23, 2018

1) State-run Banks Will Not Fund Freeport Divestment


2) Indonesia escalating violence against West Papuans 
3) Melanesian Spearhead Group failing - Ralph Regenvanu  
4) 32 foreign diplomats enjoy visit to Raja Ampat: Yembise



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1) State-run Banks Will Not Fund Freeport Divestment

TEMPO.COJakarta - State-owned mining holding company INALUM has announced the financial backing to acquire 51 percent of Freeport Indonesia’s shares will be funded by foreign banks so as not to disrupt the rupiah echange rate.
“We do not want to affect the rupiah’s conversion because the transaction will be conducted overseas utilizing US dollars. INALUM and Freeport Indonesia’s income are in dollars, which is why it will not disrupt the exchange rate of the rupiah,” said INALUM head of corporate communications Rendi Ahmad Witular today.
However, Rendi stopped short of pinpointing which foreign banks would be invloved in the funding. 
Earlier, the head of the Association of State-Owned Banks (Himbara), Maryono, said four state-owned banks would not participate in funding INALUM. He added that the funding would possibly be done by privately-owned or foreign banks.
“Yes, the reason is to flow cash into Indonesia from other countries that will increase our foreign exchange,” said Maryono.
On Thursday, July 12, the Indonesian government represented by INALUM ratified the head of agreement for Freeport McMoran Inc share sales and the participation rights for Rio Tinto in Freeport Indonesia to INALUM.


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http://www.scoop.co.nz/stories/WO1807/S00082/indonesia-escalating-violence-against-west-papuans.htm

2) Indonesia escalating violence against West Papuans

Press release - Indonesia escalating violence against West Papuans 
23/7/2018
Reports and footage of villages burning from Indonesian military strikes in West Papua in the last week indicate a new escalation in violence against West Papuans according to solidarity group, West Papua Action Auckland [WPAA] 
“ The exact locations and number of civilian injuries and deaths are hard to quantify, but the Alguru village area has clearly been under violent attack and many families have fled into the forest with no support. Our organisation is deeply concerned about this escalation and has written to the New Zealand Minister of Foreign Affairs calling for him to immediately raise the need for in independent investigation of these events. If security forces in the highlands are attacking communities with or without Indonesian Government endorsement they must be stopped. As a neighbour we cannot just sit in silence while villages are firebombed. The Prime Minister hosted President Widodo of Indonesia recently and made some small reference to human rights concerns. This is far a from adequate response to the ongoing situation in West Papua whereby human rights and self determination are actively suppressed. The latest incidents show the Indonesian Government allowing state violence against communities and our Government needs to speak out against this,” said WPAA coordinator and former MP Catherine Delahunty. The group is still waiting for a response from the Minister of Foreign Affairs.
ENDS
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3) Melanesian Spearhead Group failing - Ralph Regenvanu
4:53 pm today


Vanuatu's Foreign Minister says he's lost faith in the Melanesian Spearhead Group because of a lack of consensus and political engagement.
The group had become especially contentious after including Indonesia in 2015, which had clashed with United Liberation Movement for West Papua, which holds observer status.
In an interview with Australian thinktank the Development Policy Centre, Ralph Regenvanu, said the MSG was disappointing and becoming less relevant.
"That consensus approach to decision making is failing in the MSG. Vanuatu's been consistently saying that it's not happy with the way that decisions are made, that they're not made in the consensus manner, and that's continuing."
Mr Regenvanu said if the group returns to its purpose it could become relevant again.


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4) 32 foreign diplomats enjoy visit to Raja Ampat: Yembise
Reporter:  

Sorong, W Papua (ANTARA News) - Some 32 foreign diplomats, participating in the 2018 diplomatic tour to Raja Ampat District in West Papua Province, enjoyed their visit, according to Women`s Empowerment and Child Protection Minister Yohana Yembise.

The foreign envoys were captivated by the view of Raja Ampat from the Piaynemo top, the minister stated here, Monday.

They also lauded the environmental preservation efforts made owing to the local, traditional, and cultural wisdom, she pointed out.

Yembise expressed hope that the foreign ambassadors and diplomats would spread the word around on Raja Ampat`s scenic beauty in their countries.

The minister is optimistic that the diplomatic tour would help to increase the number of foreign tourists to Raja Ampat.

"Let us preserve the underwater natural scenery of Rapa Ampat, so we can benefit from sustainable tourism for the sake of the children and grandchildren," she emphasized.

The Indonesian archipelago of Raja Ampat, fondly monikered the "living Eden" or "paradise on Earth," was earlier a lesser-known tourist spot, familiar only to intrepid travelers and avid divers.

A crown jewel of Indonesia, Raja Ampat has crystal-clear turquoise waters and isles that are covered by thick, green carpets of dense forests and mangrove swamps.

Located in the Coral Triangle, the heart of the world`s coral reef biodiversity, between the Pacific and Indian oceans in eastern Indonesia`s West Papua Province, the world is now taking notice of Raja Ampat after the Indonesian government intensified its tourism promotion here.

Editor: Otniel Tamindael
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Sunday, July 22, 2018

1) Indonesia firebombs West Papuan village


2) The ULMWP opens new office in Merouke, West Papua

3) Thirty one inmates break out of Jayapura jail
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1) Indonesia firebombs West Papuan village
Indonesia has repeatedly fire-bombed a highland village in West Papuam, where indigenous Papuans have lived for thousands of years, the United Liberation Movement for West Papua (ULMWP) said in a July 16 statement.
ULMWP spokesperson Jacob Rumbiak severely criticised the Indonesian government for its ongoing strafing the village of Kalguru since the June 27 local government elections. Rumbiak called for the United Nations to intervene and mediate talks.
Video has emerged of military-helicopters circling the flaming village after the election, and extra military, police and intelligence were sent to the isolated highland region ahead of the elections.
“The Indonesian government’s incineration of Kalguru is the republic’s scorched-earth policy at work; leaving us with a mass of heritage-charcoal and hundreds of women and children in the forest without food and medicine,” Rumbiak said.
ULMP said that no one knew how many had been killed by Indonesia’s recent attacks this month. 

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2) The ULMWP opens new office in Merouke, West Papua





July 14, 1969, was the first day of the the Act of free Choice’s execution in Merauke, so in this moment we, the ULMWP Legislative of the Anim- Ha Region and Legislative Tribes of the Anim-Ha Region, West Papua, along with the people of West Papua inaugurate the ULMWP Office of the Anim- Ha, Merouke, West Papua. We express the attitude of the 30 Indigenous peoples tribes in Anim-Ha to reject the Act of free Choice (PEPERA), and to support the full manual petition of West Papua in 2017 with a total of 1.8 million signatures.
The inauguration of the office of the United Liberation Movement for West Papua (ULMWP) was officially opened by ULMWP legislative secretary, Sir. Eliaser Anggaigon in the Anim-Ha Region, Merouke, West Papua. After opening its doors to the public the organising leadership of the ULMWP in Merouke addressed the crowd by releasing the following statement:
Statement to reject the Act of free choice (PEPERA) 1969 in West Papua because it is not a true act of self determination.
The right of self-determination for the people of West Papua is the solution!
The dispute over West Papua between the Netherlands and Indonesia in the 1960s brought the two countries into negotiations that ended in an agreement that came to be known as the New York Agreement. This Agreement consists of 29 Articles governing 3 kinds of things. Among them are articles 14-21 regulating self determination based on International practice of “one man one voice” (one man, one vote). And articles 12 and 13 governing the transfer of the administration of West Papua to the United Nations Temporary Executive (UNTEA) and then to the Government of Indonesia, which took place on 1st May 1963. Then colonial Indonesia called it the Day of Integration or the return of West Papua into Indonesia’s lap.
Prior to that, on September 30th, 1962 the Rome Agreement was pinned down so that Indonesia would encourage development and prepare for the implementation of the Act of Free Choice in West Papua in 1969.
Nevertheless, in practice, Indonesia actually mobilised its military on a large scale to West Papua to dampen the Free Papua Movement. They organised Special Operations (OPSUS), which were chaired by Indonesian General Ali Murtopo, and was tasked with winning the West Papuan People’s self determination (PEPERA) for Indonesia. But this was followed by military operations against the West Papuan people such as Operation Sadar, Operations  Kancil,  Operation Bhratayudha, Operation Tumpas and Operation Pamungkas .
As a result of these operations, violations of the political rights of the Papuan people are tremendous with enormous destruction of the West Papuan people. Detention, murder, manipulation of Papuan political rights, sexual harassment, cultural abuse, racism and crimes against humanity within these 6 years, 1963-69. This continues to happen until this decade. More ironically again, on April 7, 1967 the first working contract with PT. Freeport McMoran, an American mining company and its allies, was signed by the Suharto regime which claims the territory of West Papua for the Government of Indonesia 2 Years before the Act of free choice (PEPERA), West Papua’s right of self determination was implemented. So it can be ascertained, whatever the way and whatever the reason, it had been decided that West Papua should be included in the power of the Government of Indonesia’s colonialism.
Exactly on the July 14th, 1969, the Act of free Choice (PEPERA) was started in Merauke and was ended on August 2, 1969, in Jayapura. At that time, the total population of West Papuan indigenous people numbered about 809,337 people, and they all had the right to engage in the Act of free choice (PEPERA), but it did not happen and we were represented by only 1,025 people. Those who have been selected to be involved in the Act of free Choice were quarantined by the Indonesian government and only 175 people gave their opinion.
Indonesia implemented the undemocratic Act of free Choice (PEPERA), full of terror, intimidation and manipulation along with the occurrence of gross human rights violations that occurred systematically at that time.
The practice of colonialism was then applied by the Government of Indonesia to the present time to dampen the aspirations of West Papuan people for freedom. When West Papua was annexed into the framework of the Unitary State of the Republic of Indonesia (NKRI), the struggle and effort of the people of West Papua was not broken. Almost eternally long, West Papuans have struggled to regain their rights and dignity as human beings who have been killed by the colonial system of Indonesia.
In the long journey of West Papua’s struggle, to respond to the needs of the struggle, the West Papuans have intelligently formed a representative forum under the name of United Liberation Movement for West Papua (ULMWP). In 2017, the ULMWP has gathered West Papua people’s signatures through a Manual Petition from all areas ofWest Papua. The petition is one part of the West Papuan people’s protest against the Act of free Choice (PEPERA) which was not in line with International practice. West Papuans from all regions of Anim-Ha have also signed the petition, with a total of 213,423 signatures from our area.
The West Papuan people firmly state that the representatives of the Pepera Council from the Anim-Ha Region (Merauke) involved in the Act of free Choice (PEPERA),1969, were unlawful representatives. Now the West Papuan people of the Anim-Ha Region, West Papua, represented by 213,423 [Two Hundred and Thirteen Thousand Four Hundred Twenty-Three] people who signed the petition demand that the violation of Political Rights that occurred 49 years ago must be reviewed and that a new vote be held with international supervision.
Based on the historical reality that the West Papua people’s political rights have been brutally silenced, the enduring desire of the West Papuan people to be free and independent in our homeland and free from existing colonisation. On the 49th anniversary of the Act of free choice (PEPERA) which is very contrary to international practice, the legislative of the ULMWP, Anim-Ha Area with West Papua people states that:
1. We, the Indigenous Peoples with the Legislative Representatives of ULMWP and the Tribes The ANIM-HA region firmly reject the act of free choice [PEPERA] in 1969 and immediately request a Referendum for West Papua under international legal and political supervision.
2. We, Indigenous Peoples with Legislative Representatives ULMWP and the Tribes ANIM-HA territory fully supports the West Papua People’s manual petition 2017 with 1.8 million signatures.
3. We, the Indigenous Peoples together with Legislative Representatives of the ULMWP Tribe ANIM-HA territory demand to the United Nations, the Netherlands, USA and Indonesia that they immediately open a free political space based on international legal standards, so that West Papuans can implement the referendum again.
This is the statement of attitude that we make.
We will continue to speak out against all forms of colonialism, oppression and exploitation that are taking place in West Papua until the West Papuan people gain true and lasting independence!


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3) Thirty one inmates break out of Jayapura jail
Reporter:  

Sentani, Papua (ANTARA News) - Police clarified on Sunday that a total of 31 inmates have broken out of the Doyo Baru Narcotics Prison of Wibu Sub-District, Jayapura District, Papua, not 25 prisoners as reported earlier.

Jayapura District Police Head Adjunct Senior Commissioner Victor Mackhon told ANTARA here on Sunday that he had earlier received report that 25 inmates from the prison had escaped.

After conducting an investigation, police found that 31 prisoners have fled on Sunday morning at 10 a.m local time, he said.

They broke the jail`s Cenderawasih 1.1 block by knocking the trellis of the room ventilation and used the trellis as a ladder to climb the jail`s wall.

"The total number of prisoners who escaped was 31, two of which had been recaptured. The other 29 are still hunted by the police and prison officials," he said.

Reported by Musa Abubakar
(a014/ )
(T.SYS/C/A014/C/R013) 
Editor: Heru Purwanto
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Saturday, July 21, 2018

1) Dialogue with Indonesia is not the answer for West Papua: ULMWP

2) Indonesia’s Papua ‘cover-up reflex’ prompts police dormitory raid

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1) Dialogue with Indonesia is not the answer for West Papua: ULMWP


  • The United Liberation Movement speaks with one voice and with one clear message.
    “We demand the freedom of our people and nation from colonial rule is delivered to us through a genuine act of self-determination, in the form of an internationally supervised vote,” Benny Wenda, Chairman of the United Liberation Movement for West Papua (ULMWP) conveyed in a statement yesterday.
    “Our position also remains crystal clear that there is no room for dialogue with Indonesia; the time for that has long passed. Instead, as pointed out yesterday by Secretary Rumakeik, the only place for ‘dialogue’ on the issue of West Papua is the floor of the UN, where the wrongs of the past must now be corrected.”
    The ULMWP seeks to remind key players at the UN of the legacy of failure they inherit, as well as their sacred duty under their Charter to ensure the decolonisation process is completed by giving the West Papuan peoples their inhalable right to self- determination.
    The ULMWP chairman noted that Secretary Rumakeik’s comments echoed the sentiment expressed by PNG’s Prime Minister and current Chair of the MSG, Peter O’Neill, who recently stated he would like to encourage others to take the issue of West Papua to the UN. “We are encouraging that this be put to the decolonisation committee of the United Nations,” he also said.
    The recent reports from Amnesty International and the International Coalition for Papua, that both highlight the huge number of extrajudicial killings carried out by Indonesian Security forces against our people, should show the international community why ULMWP dialogue with Indonesia is not possible. It would also be a betrayal of our people and the 500,000+ who have lost their lives under Indonesian occupation.
    “The only solution is for us to be allowed a genuine act of self-determination, through an internationally supervised vote,” the chairman concludes.
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2) Indonesia’s Papua ‘cover-up reflex’ prompts police dormitory raid
  

A video of a demonstration marking the bloody Biak massacre of 6 July 1998 staged last year. Video: BBB Times
By Michelle Winowatan
Dozens of Indonesian military and police personnel raided a student dormitory in Surabaya on July 6 to stop the screening of a documentary about security force atrocities in Papua.
It is the latest example of the government’s determination not to deal with past abuses in the country’s easternmost province.
Security forces carried out the raid following social media postings about the planned screening of the documentary Bloody Biak (Biak Berdarah).
The film documents Indonesian security forces opening fire on a peaceful pro-Papuan independence flag-raising ceremony in the town of Biak in July 1998, killing dozens.



Security forces said the dorm raid was necessary to prevent unspecified “hidden activities” by Papuan students.
The raid is emblematic of both the Indonesian government’s failure to deliver on promises of accountability for past human rights abuses in Papua and its willingness to take heavy-handed measures to stifle public discussion about those violations.
The government of President Joko “Jokowi” Widodo has not fulfilled a commitment made in 2016to seek resolution of longstanding human rights abuses, including the Biak massacre and the military crackdown on Papuans in Wasior in 2001 and Wamena in 2003 that killed dozens and displaced thousands.
Killing with impunity
Meanwhile, police and other security forces that kill Papuans do so with impunity.
Media coverage of rights abuses in Papua are hobbled by the Indonesian government’s decades-old access restrictions to the region, despite Jokowi’s 2015 pledge to lift them.
Domestic journalists are vulnerable to intimidation and harassment from officials, local mobs, and security forces.
The government is also hostile to foreign human rights observers seeking access to Papua.
Last month, the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights, Zeid Ra’ad Al Hussein, said he was “concerned that despite positive engagement by the authorities in many respects, the government’s invitation to my Office to visit Papua – which was made during my visit in February – has still not been honoured”.
The raid in Surabaya signals the government’s determination to maintain its chokehold on public discussion of human rights violations across Indonesia.
This suggests that the government’s objective is to maintain Papua as a ”forbidden island” rather than provide transparency and accountability for human rights abuses there.
Michelle Winowatan is a Human Rights Watch intern. The Pacific Media Centre’s Pacific Media Watch freedom project monitors Asia-Pacific rights issues.
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Friday, July 20, 2018

Pato reaffirms PNG's position on West Papua to Jakarta

Pato reaffirms PNG's position on West Papua to Jakarta
38 minutes ago 


Papua new Guinea's Foreign Minister Rimbink Pato says he has reaffirmed his country's support for Indonesian control of West Papua.

PNG foreign minister Rimbink Pato meets his Indonesian counterpart Retno Marsudi in Indonesia, 19 July 2018 Photo: Rimbink Pato office

It was one of the points of discussion in Mr Pato's meeting with his Indonesian counterpart Retno Marsudi on Thursday night in Jakarta.
Mr Pato provided some clarity to the Indonesian government on what he said was some recent misreporting on the issue of PNG's stance on West Papua.
Other matters discussed in the bilateral meeting were Indonesia's assistance to PNG in its preparations for hosting the APEC leaders summit in November
Mr Pato said he was grateful that Indonesia successfully proposed PNG to host APEC 2018 and for its support in hosting the event.
He said they had a useful discussion on cooperation for the economic development of the PNG-Indonesia border regions, and on planning for the first PNG- Indonesia Ministerial Forum.
According to Mr Pato, he reaffirmed Papua New Guinea's longstanding and permanent position on the status of the West Papua and Papua provinces of Indonesia.
"They are an integral part of the Republic of Indonesia," he said.
"There has been some misreporting on this issue. Papua New Guinea's position has not changed and there is no intention to ever change it."
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Thursday, July 19, 2018

1) Military could only arise trauma among locals



2) Solidarity of Lamentations of Humanity Alguru Asked Apparatus Withdrawn from Nduga
3) Indonesia’s Papua Coverup Reflex Prompts Police Dormitory Raid
4) Freeport’s one percent fund cannot guarantee Kamoro’s future
5) Palm Oil From Indonesia's Shrinking Forests Taints Global Brands: Report
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1) Military could only arise trauma among locals



                         Student activists from BEM Uncen and PMKRI speak during press releases. -Jubi / Doc

Published 8 hours ago on 19 July 2018 By admin
Jayapura, Jubi – Chairman of Student Executive Board of the Cenderawasih University (BEM UNCEN) Paskalis Boma asks Papua Police to withdraw officers from Nduga District to prevent people from trauma.
He said the attack by the police officers occurred in Langguru and Kenyam on 11 July 2018 was very violent. “Nduga is part of Indonesia. If the police want to attack the National Liberation Army and Free Papua Movement (TPN/OPM), they shouldn’t harm the civilians,” he told Jubi on Wednesday (19/7/2018).
Further, he said the military’s attack in Nduga District was excessive as they attacked unarmed people whereas they were well-equipped. “People don’t carry weapons; they can’t fight back. They can’t do it because they are the citizens of Indonesia. This incident remains a scar and is rooted in the hearth of the local Nduga community. It only arises a fear.”
Meanwhile, Benediktus Bame, the Chairman of the Catholic Students Association of Indonesia (PMKRI) St Efrem Jayapura, the government could apply some human approaches towards the TPN/OPM. “The action taken by the government officials was very excessive. It would only arise a fear among the local people,” he said. (*)
Reporter: Hengky Yeimo
Editor: Pipit Maizier
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A google translate. Be-aware google translate can be a bit erratic.
Original bahasa link at

2) Solidarity of Lamentations of Humanity Alguru Asked Apparatus Withdrawn from Nduga
Penulis Redaksi - 19 Juli 2018






JAYAPURA (PT) - Dozens of students who joined in Alguru's Humanitarian Solidarity Solidarity in Nduga staged a peaceful demonstration at the Papua Parliament Office on Thursday (19/7/18).

They asked the security forces to withdraw from Nduga after the invasion of Alguru village.

In fact, they also urged the government to be responsible for the victims of Alguru civilian shootings.

"The governmt is immediately responsible for the restoration of civilian security conditions in Nduga," he said
Coordinator of action, Remes Ubruangge when delivering speeches before the Speaker of Papua House, DR. Yunus Wonda, SH, MH accompanied by Ruben Magai, Nason Utty, Laurenzus Kadepa, Elvis Tabuni, Gerson Soma, Emus Gwijangge and John Ronsumbre and representatives from Komnas HAM RI Sandrayati Moniaga, SH.

In addition, the demonstrators also urged the government to immediately open access for the establishment of the Fact Finding Team and immediately withdraw non-organic and organic troops from Nduga.

It is said, people just want to live in the country without terror and now the people of Alguru grieve.

"We will boycott Presidential Election 2019 if President Jokowi can not solve the problem of human rights violations that occurred in Papua," koar one of the student representatives when delivering his oration.

In his statement, the demonstrators conveyed three things namely, urging Jokowi to stop military operations in Nduga.

Then urged the President to remove the Chief of Police, Chief of Police of Papua, Commander of the TNI, Pangdam XVII / Cenderawasih because they are considered to have committed human rights violations against civilians in Nduga.

In addition, urging the Presdien to open access for independent human rights workers to Nduga to obtain facts, as well as to open access to humanitarian aid in Nduga, and to urge the Australian, British, Dutch and other governments to immediately stop military assistance to TNI / Polri to Indonesia.

Meanwhile, Speaker of the Papua House, Yunus Wonda who received the aspirations of the students said, since the incident in Nduga his side had taken a stand and demanded the withdrawal of all troops in Nduga.

"We will continue to urge people's lives back to normal. We've done what we have to do, "explained Yunus Wonda.

"All security forces must be withdrawn from Nduga," he said.

According to him, not only the responsibility of the House of Representatives of Papua Nduga, but all members of the House of Representatives of Papua.

"Whatever the reason, all the security forces must be withdrawn from Nduga, because there is not a military operation area," he asserted.

In the same place, Komnas HAM RI, Sandrayati Moniaga who attended the demonstration to convey deep sorrow to the people who are victims of the case teraebut.

Both Nduga victims and victims occurred in other areas of Papua.

"For Komnas HAM, all human beings are equal, whether he is Papuan or not, for us all the same," he explained.

Admittedly, the problem in Nduga is not just happening in Papua but in other areas such as Aceh, Maluku, Kalimantan and Java are also experiencing the same thing.

"Until now thousands of victims have not received justice. So the government is responsible for solving this problem, "he said.

"We are an independent institution will continue to encourage the government to follow up. A statement from our listeners we hear and we will continue to convey, "he concluded. (fig / dm)



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3) Indonesia’s Papua Coverup Reflex Prompts Police Dormitory Raid
July 19, 2018 2:26PM EDT

Michelle Winowatan Intern, Asia Division

Dozens of Indonesian military and police personnel raided a student dormitory in Surabaya on July 6 to stop the screening of a documentary about security force atrocities in Papua. It’s the latest example of the government’s determination not to deal with past abuses in the country’s easternmost province.

Authorities Cite ‘Hidden Activities’ to Cancel Screening of Papuan Film 
Security forces carried out the raid following social media postings about the planned screening of “Bloody Biak.” The film documents the security forces opening fire on a peaceful pro-Papuan independence flag-raising ceremony in the town of Biak in July 1998, killing dozens. They said the dorm raid was necessary to prevent unspecified “hidden activities” by Papuan students.

The raid is emblematic of both the Indonesian government’s failure to deliver on promises of accountability for past human rights abuses in Papua and its willingness to take heavy-handed measures to stifle public discussion about those violations. The government of President Joko “Jokowi” Widodo has not fulfilled a commitment made in 2016 to seek resolution of longstanding human rights abuses, including the Biak massacre and the military crackdown on Papuans in Wasior in 2001 and Wamena in 2003 that killed dozens and displaced thousands. Meanwhile, police and other security forces that kill Papuans do so with impunity.

Media coverage of rights abuses in Papua are hobbled by the Indonesian government’s decades-old access restrictions to the region, despite Jokowi’s 2015 pledge to lift them. Domestic journalists are vulnerable to intimidation and harassment from officials, local mobs, and security forces. The government is also hostile to foreign human rights observers seeking access to Papua. Last month, the United Nations high commissioner for human rights, Zeid Ra’ad Al Hussein, said he is “concerned that despite positive engagement by the authorities in many respects, the Government’s invitation to my Office to visit Papua – which was made during my visit in February – has still not been honoured.”
The raid in Surabaya signals the government’s determination to maintain its chokehold on public discussion of human rights violations across Indonesia. This suggests that the government’s objective is to maintain Papua as a ”forbidden island” rather than provide transparency and accountability for human rights abuses there.
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4) Freeport’s one percent fund cannot guarantee Kamoro’s future

Published 8 hours ago on 19 July 2018 By admin
Jayapura, Jubi – The Secretary for the Government, Politics, Law and Human Rights Commission of the Papua House of Representatives Mathea Mamoyao, who is also a Kamoro native, said ‘one percent fund’, 1% of Freeport’s gross revenues go to the local tribes, does not guarantee the sustainable future of those tribes.
“I don’t know whether this compensation is still there or not. I don’t want certain people took advantages on it, while people are still living under the poverty,” she told Jubi on Wednesday (18/7/2018).

Further, she said what she wants is a guarantee for the Kamoro tribe to live in a better condition in the future. But the fact is the education and health services in the Kamoro region is still poor. “For all the times, I’ll keep talking about it, because as a native, I don’t want the young generation of my tribe not to survive in the future,” she said.
Meanwhile, the board of Meepago Customary Council John NR Gobai said indigenous peoples as the tenure landowners collect the promise of the Indonesian Government on the bargain involved Freeport, the Central Government and the landowners on 4 September 2017.
“At that time, the Minister of Energy and Mineral Resources Ignatius Jonan agreed to accommodate the request of Amungme tribe asking Freeport to give a reimbursement of 1% fund which they received as the Corporate Social Responsibly funds into larger value shares,” he said. (*)
Reporter: Arjuna Pademme
Editor: Pipit Maizier

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5) Palm Oil From Indonesia's Shrinking Forests Taints Global Brands: Report
By : Fergus Jensen and Bernadette Christina Munthe | on 6:01 PM July 19, 2018
Jakarta. Palm oil sourced from illegally cleared rainforest areas in Indonesia has flowed through traders to major consumer goods brands despite widespread commitments to cease purchases of non-sustainable oil, a new report says.
Palm oil companies Royal Golden Eagle (RGE), Wilmar, Musim Mas Group and Golden Agri Resources sold oil from 21 "tainted" mills to more than a dozen global brands including Nestlé and Unilever, according to the report by Eyes on the Forest (EoF), a coalition of environmental nongovernmental organizations, including WWF Indonesia.
In spot checks since 2011, EoF used GPS tracking to follow trucks carrying palm oil fruit, known as fresh fruit bunches, to mills from plantations within Tesso Nilo National Park and the Bukit Tigapuluh protected forest areas in central Sumatra.
"All companies bought directly or indirectly from at least some of the 21 implicated mills," according to the report, which calls for traceability on palm oil to be improved and to be extended to plantations that supply mills.

Forest cover on Sumatra Island, home to endangered tigers, orangutans and elephants, had declined by more than half to 11 million hectares in 2016 from the 25 million hectares it had in 1985, as palm oil and other plantations have expanded and encroached on protected areas.
Nestlé said in an emailed response it was "committed to tackling" deforestation. A company spokeswoman said the firm was working with partners to transform the palm oil industry "further down the supply chain."
Unilever said by email it publicly disclosed suppliers and mill details and was committed to increasing traceability in the palm oil supply chain "and to working with our suppliers and partners to resolve issues."
Unilever also said it was examining "details behind the investigation to determine the right approach and next steps."
Environment Ministry spokesman Djati Witjaksono Hadi said smallholders, "not companies," owned plantations in national parks.
Hadi referred further questions on the mills to the ministries of agriculture and industry, which did not immediately respond to requests for comment.
Similar issues were highlighted in earlier EoF reports including in 2016, but a lack of strict supervision by traders has led to more forest clearing and illegally grown palm oil entering global supply chains despite their commitments to improve traceability and stop deforestation, the report said.

Traceability
"We acknowledge that it's really challenging to get traceability beyond the mill and going right down to the plantation source," Elizabeth Clarke, WWF global palm oil lead, told Reuters. "But it's absolutely paramount that they do this."
Among those mentioned in the report, Wilmar International was accused of buying palm oil from Citra Riau Sarana (CRS) whose three mills were found to have bought fresh fruit bunches from Tesso Nilo in 2011, 2012, 2015 and 2017, even though Wilmar sold its 95 percent stake in CRS in 2014.
"Whatever action they've been taking, it hasn't fixed that particular mill, and this is what we're asking these particular individuals to do," the WWF's Clarke said.
Responding to the report, Wilmar said it had "continued to engage with CRS and to monitor their traceability system" from 2014. "While there was progress made on traceability, we have stopped purchasing from them since June 2018 for other reasons," Wilmar said in an emailed statement.
But Wilmar said it had not received "a clear confirmation from the authorities which companies are illegal in the landscape" despite making a request to the Environment Ministry.
CRS could not immediately be reached by phone for comment.
Sime Darby Plantation, also named in the report, said it had 94 percent visibility of its supply chain "which provides key customers access to traceability information that can help them make informed choices about the palm oil products that they purchase."
It also said it was working with nongovernmental organizations to eradicate deforestation for the remaining 6 percent.

Daniel A. Prakarsa, head of downstream sustainability at Sinar Mas Agribusiness and Food, a subsidiary of Golden Agri, said the company considered 39 percent of its output to be fully traceable, and was targeting full traceability from the 427 mills of its suppliers by 2020.
"Our policy is to help suppliers to comply. Not just [saying] 'this is our standard, you must comply, otherwise we stop [buying],'" he said.
Musim Mas Group did not immediately respond to a written request for comment. On its website, the group says it is working with smallholders and other stakeholders along the supply chain to achieve sustainable palm oil production.
Clarke from the WWF said trading firms "need to make it very clear to the mills that they won't buy from them until they can provide assurance that it is 100 percent legal."
Reuters
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Wednesday, July 18, 2018

1) Tommy Soeharto Listed for the Papua Legislative Candidacy


2) Indonesia, PNG foreign ministers to discuss border issues

3) Answers by Dutch Foreign Affairs Minister Stef Blok to questions on the Amnesty International  article 
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1) Tommy Soeharto Listed for the Papua Legislative Candidacy

TEMPO.COJakarta - Berkarya Party Chairman and late-Soeharto’s youngest son, Hutomo Mandala Putra or Tommy Soeharto declared that he has listed himself as a Papua legislative candidate (caleg) for the 2019 general elections.
Tommy’s name was registered to the General Elections Commission (KPU) together with Berkarya Party’s 575 soon-to-be legislative candidates on Tuesday night.
The party’s secretary general Priyo Budi Santoso revealed the reason behind Tommy Soeharto’s candidacy in Papua. He claims that the people of Papua has a sense of enthusiasm and nostalgic towards Soeharto’s past administration under the country’s New Order.
“The enthusiasm of people in rural areas were outstanding, they welcomed (Tommy) with the spirit and memories of President Soeharto’s administration,” Priyo claimed.
Other than Tommy Soeharto, legislative candidates that Berkarya Party enlisted are actors Andi Arsyil and senior actress Paramitha Rusady.
Priyo said that there are many former Golkar Party members that chose to jump ship and join Berkarya Party for the 2019 legislative elections. “From the 575 names that we registered, 30 percent of them are former members of other political parties,” said the Berkarya Party secretary general.
DEWI NURITA
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2) Indonesia, PNG foreign ministers to discuss border issues

Reporter:  
    Jakarta  (ANTARA News) - Indonesian Foreign Minister Retno Marsudi will have a bilateral meeting with her Papua New Guinea (PNG) counterpart Rimbink Pato on Thursday (July 19) afternoon to discuss several border issues.

    "PNG is one of Indonesia`s close neighbors; it is natural that both countries have a high intensity of relationships. PNG is not only a big country in terms of size but also in terms of economy," Foreign Ministry`s spokesperson Arrmanatha Nasir told journalists during a press briefing in Jakarta on Wednesday.

    The management of Indonesia-PNG border regions is among topics that will be discussed between the two ministers, in addition to the establishment of Indonesia-PNG joint border committee.

    "We have a fairly long border area with PNG, and we are aware of the economic potential that can be developed for the welfare of people living in the border area," Nasir added.

    In addition to discussing border issues, Marsudi and Pato will also talk about bilateral economic cooperation, especially efforts to improve trade and investment.

    The value of RI-PNG bilateral trade in 2017 reached US$208.89 million, increasing from $179.2 million in 2016.

   "The two foreign ministers expressed concerns for (strengthening) trade cooperation, including efforts to improve the interaction between businessmen of both countries," Nasir concluded.

  
Editor: Bambang Purwanto

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via regwestpapua list
3) Answers by Dutch Foreign Affairs Minister Stef Blok to questions on the Amnesty International  article ‘Indonesia : security forces have killed 100 peoples in Papoea’  by member of the house  Lilianne Ploumen (labour party). 17 July 2018.
Q1
Did you take notice of the Amnesty International article ‘Indonesia : security forces have killed 100 peoples in Papoea’ and the report ‘Don’t bother, just let them die: killing with impunity in Papua’ that was published on 2 July 2018?

A2
Yes

Q2
What is your reaction to the report?

A2
The Amnesty report refers to the situation in the Indonesian provinces of Papua and West Papua. With that, the report specifically focusses on the violence committed there by security-forces (police and military staff) and the lack of independent and criminal investigation to these incidents.
The findings in the report are perilous. Amnesty reports 95 casualties in the period between January 2010 and February 2018 by such violence. The pith of the matter seems to be between 2012 and 2015. In this period over 10 fatalities per year were identified. The past recent years the number of fatal incidents seems to decline.
In general the cabinet states it is important for government security staff to execute their violence-mandate within the boundaries of proportionality and that there is a possibility for thorough and independent investigation. 

Q3 (combined with 6&7)
Did you have contact with the Indonesian government regarding the violation of the right to demonstrate and other human rights violations when police and military are deployed against peaceful protesters?

Q6
Are you prepared to mention this report, and the necessity for an independent inquiry to the Indonesian government during your upcoming visit? If not, why not?

Q7
During you upcoming visit, will you urge the authorities to undertake initiatives to stop the killing in Papua, amongst others by readjusting the violence-instructions of the police and military so they are in line with human rights? If not, why not?

A3,6,7

The human rights situation in the Indonesian provinces of Papua and West Papua knows several areas of concern, amongst others incidents of violence against civilians, but also the freedom of speech and the position of human rights defenders and (local) journalists. The human rights situations in Papua are frequently discussed in diplomatic communications with Indonesia, as well as during political consultations between the Netherlands and Indonesia in November 2017 and during the European Union-Indonesia human rights dialogue in February 2018.
During my visit to Indonesia on 3 and 4 July, I spoke with civil society organizations amongst them Amnesty International and the Indonesian minister of Foreign Affairs Retno Marsudi regarding the human rights situation in Papua and the content of the Amnesty International report. In the conversation with my Indonesian counterpart Marsudi I mentioned the importance of transparent investigation on the proportionality of (police) violence. Minister Marsudi indicated being familiar with the content of the report and reaffirmed that the development of Papua is a priority to the Indonesian government. To ad to that, the Indonesian government is also in contact with NGO’s , amongst them Amnesty International. The embassy of The Netherlands in Jakarta remains to follow the developments in Papua closely.

 Q4
Do you share the findings of Amnesty International that the ongoing police violence and impunity are undoing the effects of the community policing program, supported by the Netherlands? If not, why not? If  so, do you support the call from Amnesty for an independent investigation into all murders committed by security forces?

A4
The Netherlands is supporting the community policing programme of the International Organisation of Migration (IOM) on Papua and the Mollucas. This programme has set as a goal to improve the relations between police and the local population on Papua and the Mollucas. The programme focusses exclusively on unarmed neighbourhood police officers, who live in the local community  and are active to serve the civilians. The target group of the programme therefore are not the armed police officers, who according to the Amnesty report, are involved in the alleged extra judicial executions.  
The Dutch lower house was informed by letter on the progress and results of the community policing programme on 18 June 2018. In this letter it was reported that the programme achieved several positive results. The programme resulted in a specially designed human rights module which has been added to the curriculum  for community policing officers throughout Indonesia. Such results remain, with the findings of Amnesty International in mind, as relevant as ever. 

Q5
Is this report reason for you to increase the effectiveness of the Dutch financed community policing programme? If so, what steps will you undertake?

A5
As stated in my answer to the house  on march 16 2018, the current Dutch contribution to the community policing programme lasts until June 2019. To strengthen the effects of the programme, the programme was extended in 2017 with an emphasis on decreasing external funding and increasing undertaking of activities by the communities and the police themselves.
The phasing out results are positive thus far. From august 2017 until April 2018 32,4% of the funding was raised by local sources. The goal is to eventually phase out completely  and letting community policing programmes run itself independently. I see no reason at this point of phasing out to take further steps to improve the effectiveness of the programme.

Please read or download the official press release here (Dutch):

Translation Pro Papua
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