Sunday, December 10, 2017

1) AMNESTY INTERNATIONAL CALLED AN URGENT ACTION FOR PAPUAN WORKERS, MARTINUS BEANAL


2) Queensland entrepreneurs aim to 'turn everyday Aussies into everyday Elon Musks' with new venture
3) TEN BRIDGES CONNECTING WAMENA-KENYAM COMPLETED IN 2017
4) ULMWP NEW LEADERSHIP SEND GRATITUDE TO THE PEOPLE OF VANUATU
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1) AMNESTY INTERNATIONAL CALLED AN URGENT ACTION FOR PAPUAN WORKERS, MARTINUS BEANAL
Jakarta, Jubi – Martinus Beanal, a Papuan worker has disappeared since 7 November in the midst of alleged escalated armed clashes in Utikini village, Tembagapura District, Mimika Regency, Papua Province. The Police have announced that he was dead and buried by his family, a claim that has been refuted by his family. His whereabouts are still unknown.
Martinus Beanal, a worker in Pangan Sari Utama company, a food supplier firm of Freeport McMoran company was missing on his way home in the morning of 7 November. He departed from the company’s compound in Tembagapura district to his village in Opitawak village in Mimika Regency, Papua Province at 5am. According to his family, Martinus said that he was stopped by armed forces that forbid him to pass because the military and police operations in the area. Because of the blockade, Martinus went through an alternative route to his village that should take him around 2 to 3 hours walking. Around 6.30am he called his family members informing that he was resting near a telecommunication tower. He told his family members that he was unsure about which route to take because the road had intersections and they had some tracks of military shoes along the way. The call was cut off when one of his family heard a series of gunshot in the telephone.
Subsequently, Martinus’ wife called some villagers from Opitawak village to find and bring Martinus back to the village. However, the villagers decided to run back to their village after hearing gunshots around 7am in the area near Martinus’ last known location. After contacting Martinus’ wife and family, at 8am the villagers decided to go to the area near the telecommunication tower, but were stopped by the armed forces and told to turn 
According to the police and military force, there has been ongoing armed conflict in Tembagapura district, Mimika around Freeport Indonesia company compound since August 2017. The police and military forces operated in the area claimed that they were fighting an armed pro-Papuan independence group (Free Papua Movement or OPM). One police officer was killed and several civilians were injured on 21 October. However, Papuan human rights groups could not confirm that there were armed clashes between the security forces and the armed pro-independence group in Tembagapura area. On 10 November, a police spokesperson announced to the media that Martinus was found dead on 9 November in an area that had been occupied by armed pro-independence group and subsequently buried by his family, a claim that had been refuted by his family.
Therefore, Amnesty International, through their official letter no UA: 262/17 Index: ASA 21/7544/2017 Issue Date: 5 December 2017 called civil society to send letter to authorities to call on the authorities to reveal Martinus Beanal’s fate and whereabouts and ensure his safety; call on the authorities to independently investigate the circumstances of Martinus’ disappearance and ensure that his family are provided with accurate information about the outcome of this investigation.
The letter of appeal should be sent to The Head of National Police; Head of Papua Police Force; Chairperson of the National Human Rights Commission (Komnas HAM); and also diplomatic representatives of respecting countries, before January  16.
Enforced disappearance is a serious human rights violation and a crime under international law which violates the rights of the persons who were disappeared and of their loved ones. The Declaration on the Protection of All Persons from Enforced Disappearances, adopted by the United Nations General Assembly in 1992, provides that an investigation “should be conducted for as long as the fate of the victim of enforced disappearance remains unclarified” (Article 13(6)). It also states that “enforced disappearance shall be considered a continuing offence as long as the perpetrators continue to conceal the fate and the whereabouts of persons who have disappeared and these facts remain unclarified” (Article 17(1)).
The Indonesian military has a long history of perpetrating enforced disappearances. Yet the Indonesian government has done little to establish the fate and whereabouts of those who were disappeared or went “missing” during the rule of Suharto or the subsequent political reform period (from 1998), including during the conflicts in Timor-Leste and Aceh. According to its 2012 Annual report, the United Nations Working Group on Enforced or Involuntary Disappearances (WGEID) holds information on 162 outstanding cases of disappearances in Indonesia, while there are a further 428 outstanding cases in Timor-Leste which mostly occurred during the period of Indonesian occupation (1975-1999). Further, the Indonesian government has yet to accept a request from the WGEID, pending since 2006, to visit the country.(*)

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2) Queensland entrepreneurs aim to 'turn everyday Aussies into everyday Elon Musks' with new venture

They met only three weeks ago, but in that short space of time three Queensland entrepreneurs have already tried and tested their invention that turns e-waste into a source of electricity for remote disadvantaged communities.
It's called PowerWells and was inspired by Tesla's Powerwall home battery, except this local initiative is a smaller version that is much cheaper, can be assembled quickly and consists entirely of e-waste that would otherwise go into landfill.
Nick Kamols, Brad Claire and Amatus Douw met in mid-November at a Logan Social Enterprise StartUp Weekend, where entrepreneurs and inventors come together and are issued with a challenge, which they have to create a solution for and present it to a panel of judges.
Mr Kamols worked as a town planner, while Mr Claire possessed a background in electronics and worked at Substation 33, a Logan recycling facility that collects electronic waste from companies and finds a way to reuse it.
However, it was Mr Douw who provided the main inspiration for the invention. He comes from West Papua in Indonesia and told his teammates that 379 local communities in his homeland don't have access to electricity, but use mobile phones heavily.

As a result, they will often spend an entire day walking and hitchhiking to the nearest city just to charge their phones, which they also use for light at night

Through Mr Claire's work at Substation 33, he sourced old laptops whose batteries had died.
They could still be reused because most of the time only one of the six cells within the battery had failed, meaning the one depleted cell could be replaced and the entire battery salvaged.

A total of 25 lithium-ion laptop batteries were combined to create one big battery, which was then connected to a solar panel.
Mr Claire said the recovered laptop batteries could then be used for an extra 10 to 20 years instead of being tossed into landfill.

He added that the resulting PowerWell could charge an iPhone and small flashlight more than 100 times and charge up to 50 devices at once.
By using recycled e-waste, a PowerWell costs about $100 to construct instead of the $2000 it would cost if new parts were used.
Mr Kamols travelled to Indonesia with a friend of Mr Douw, Franz, to test the PowerWell. Franz acted as a translator and guide on the trip, helping to source local e-waste to construct a new PowerWell in Indonesia and conduct a successful test in a remote village.
The three entrepreneurs will launch a fundraising campaign next week, encouraging companies to donate their e-waste to the PowerWells initiative and asking everyday Australians to donate to their cause this festive season.
“We’re not going from zero to 100, we’re just going zero to one, which enables economic growth and educational opportunities," Mr Kamols said.
"We hope to turn everyday Aussies into everyday Elon Musks.
"This holiday season people can channel their inner Elon and give a PowerWell to a remote village in Papua New Guinea, Indonesia and the Pacific Islands.”
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3) TEN BRIDGES CONNECTING WAMENA-KENYAM COMPLETED IN 2017

Wamena, Jubi – Ten bridges connecting Wamena-Kenyam are confirmed to be completed by the end of 2017. The bridge is part of 35 bridges to be built along the trans-Papua Wamena road, from Jayawijaya to Kenyam, Nduga.
“For the Papua-Wamena-Kenyam Trans Road itself has been translucent, but there are some great or high slopes need to be lowered again,” said Head of the National Road Implementation Work Unit (PJN) IV Papua, Togap Harianto Manik,
According to Harianto, there are currently two multi-year contracts of 35 bridges. Only 10 bridges can only be completed this year, while another 25 bridges will be completed by 2018 to 2019.
A total of 10 bridges are under construction using iron frames with varying lengths and pass through the rushing river pathways and dangerous for the people who pass.
“So there is a span or length of 100, 80 and 60 which may be quite heavy currents so it is impossible to pass by vehicle,” Harianto explained.
Not only Wamena to Kenyam, the implementation of national road in Puncak Jaya area is also targeted for completion in 2019, including roads from Wamena to Sugapa in Intan Jaya Regency.
Head of Work Unit (Satker) for the implementation of the national road of Puncak Jaya region, La Hanafi said that access to Puncak Jaya through six districts passed by Jayawijaya, Tolikara, Puncak, Puncak Jaya, Yahukimo and Lanny Jaya is targeted in the Trans Papua road program.
“Starting from Wamena to Enarotali border in Sugapa can be done in 2019,” said Hanafi.
In addition, PJN V Puncak Jaya is also working on roads starting from Dekai in Yahukimo Regency towards Kenyam, Nduga Regency, as part of trans-Papua road from Satker Jayawijaya Wamena to Kenyam.
“We ask for local governments and communities support for a non-technical way, because we are technically ready to implement it,” he said.
According to him, the total has reached 78 percent, and those are with several directions, such as Sugapa to Bioga, Bioga to Sugapa, Bioga-Illaga, Illaga to Bioga. (tabloidjubi.com/Zely)


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4) ULMWP NEW LEADERSHIP SEND GRATITUDE TO THE PEOPLE OF VANUATU
Port Vila, Jubi – The newly elected leadership of United Liberation Movement for West Papua (ULMWP) extend their gratitude to the people of Vanuatu following their first meeting in the country few days ago.
In their letter of statement received by Jubi, Wednesday (December 12) Benny Wenda, the elected chairman of ULMWP feel grateful for Vanuatu welcoming their celebration of Independence Day.
“On behalf of the newly elected leadership of ULMWP, the people of West Papua, the Papuan delegates who have travelled to be here today and our solidarity groups around the world, I would like to thank the people of Vanuatu for allowing us to celebrate our independence day here with you,” he said.

On December 1st 56 years ago, he said, West Papuans declared their independence from the Dutch and raised the Morning Star flag for the first time.
“But after all this time, we still do not have our freedom. (However) Wwe are so happy to stand with you here on your sacred ground to celebrate our national day as well as the opening of our ULMWP Head Office, thanks to the generosity and solidarity from the Vanuatu government and its people,” Wenda said.
He mentioned that the people of Vanuatu have made history for West Papua for all supports and solidarity they have been given.
“As you are aware, this journey has been a long and difficult. Quite often, we as Papuans feel that it is only us against the world. But when Vanuatu says “We will stand beside you”, it gives us hope for the future and that one day we will invite you to celebrate with us in West Papua our independence.”
Wenda admit that the challenge ahead of for them is huge, but through the unity on the in West Papua and abroad, they can achieve the goals.
“Over the last few days we have spent so many hours discussing, sharing and planning for the future of our movement. We are more united than ever. We commit to listening carefully and being accountable to our people on the ground in West Papua. It is from the people of West Papua – and all our solidarity groups around the world – that we gain our strength.”
Under our new leadership structure, Wenda said ULMWP commits to a strong and unified future as needed for the liberation of West Papua people.
He also said that the movement for liberation of West Papua is growing in strength all the time because the support they get from the Pacific.
“It is the support of our Pacific neighbours that has helped to drive the momentum we now have – and allowed nations around the world to start to support us on the international stage. Without the support of the Pacific, it would have been difficult to develop this growing international solidarity. Your continued support is essential for our cause,” he said.
On the day of global flag raising of Morning Star, Wenda paid tribute to his brothers and sisters in West Papua who will do the same (raised the banned flag—ed) , “while under threat of violence, arrest and imprisonment.”
He paid tribute to their courage and give promise to do their utmost to ensure the success of the struggle, “so that one day we will raise this flag in a free and independent West Papua,” he said.(Zely A)
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