Thursday, January 31, 2019

1) Push for change in PNG's West Papua policy announced


2) Improper spatial planning behind forest dispute, says activist
3) Truth and Reconciliation Commission might not be working in resolving human rights violations in Papua
4) Freeport Divestment: A Tale of Losses and Waste
5) Governor’s objection to Freeport not be regarded as a political decision

6) Freeport’s tax debt affects Papuan Regional Budget 2019
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1) Push for change in PNG's West Papua policy announced
about 1 hour ago
The Free West Papua Movement has held a rare press conference in Papua New Guinea to call for international action on the conflict in Indonesian ruled Papua.


Highlands-based Defense Region Command of the West Papua National Liberation Army, or TPNPB. Photo: TPNPB

Representatives of the movement's armed wing, the West Papua Liberation Army, gave an update about its conflict with Indonesian security forces in Papua's central Highlands.
Together with people from PNG's civil society, they also discussed West Papuan independence aims.
While PNG's government supports Indonesian control of Papua, MPs at the conference said there was a need to change the policy to help resolve the conflict.

The NBC journalist Rose Amos says the Governor of PNG's National Capital District, Powes Parkop, was among them.
"Governor Parkop announced that he is working on a submission to move motion in parliament for a change in the (government) policy because he says PNG government's existing policy between PNG and Indonesia is still in," Rose Amos said.
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2) Improper spatial planning behind forest dispute, says activist
Published 2 days ago on 30 January 2019 By pr9c6tr3_juben
Jayapura, Jubi – A representative of the Indigenous Peoples Coalition Emanuel Gobay said improper regional spatial planning might a factor that cause many disputes of timber and forest management in Papua.
Besides the implementation of spatial planning often differed from it should be, it was also not involving indigenous peoples in its preparation.
“As a result, it is often the indigenous lands (forests) acknowledged as the property of timber companies. We hope that in the future indigenous peoples will be involved so that they will be able to speak about their rights,” said Emanuel Gobay in the discussion on the forest issues that held in the room of Papuan Parliament on Friday (25/1/2019).
Moreover, he said that sometimes regulations could be overlapping one to another. Therefore, he urged the government to revise the existing regional regulation about spatial planning, or at least review it.
Meanwhile, regarding the spatial planning, Papuan legislator John NR Gobay said he would communicate with the Regional Development Planning Agency of Papua.
“Well, it’s because if we talk about the spatial planning, it’s a scope of the Regional Development Planning Agency. And what becomes a problem now is there is no NSPK (norm, standard, procedure and criteria) issued yet,” said Gobai. (*)
 
Reporter: Arjuna pademee
Editor: Pipit Maizier
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3) Truth and Reconciliation Commission might not be working in resolving human rights violations in Papua
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Jayapura, Jubi – A human rights activist in Papua Iwan Niode said the Truth and Reconciliation Commission might be not useful in resolving the human rights violations in Papua due to the absence of regulation.
In the workshop ‘the settlement of Human Rights Violations in Wasior 2001 and Wamena 2004: “Opportunities and Challenges”‘ held by the Papua Democracy Alliance on Thursday (24/1/2019), Niode said the Constitutional Court had cancelled the Regulation No 27 of 2004.
“This is understandable why such a plan to resolve the human rights violations cases via the Truth and Reconciliation Commission has stopped until now. Although the Special Autonomy Law indeed recommended it, there is no specific regulation supporting the TRC to conduct its task,” said Niode.
Moreover, Niode said the TRC should not only support the human rights victims to speak but also to cover the whole stories of both sides, victims and perpetrators. That makes the resolution through the TRC never been successful.
Meanwhile, a lecturer of International Relations of the Faculty of Social and Politics Science of the University of Cenderawasih, Elvira Rumkabu, thought that besides it needs the judicial process enforcement, the settlement of human rights violations in Papua also need to bring justice to the victims, how they can get their rights for justice.
“If this injury remains not cured, it would spread anywhere towards many issues. The issue of personal identity, for example,” said Rumkabu. (*)
 
Reporter: Arjuna Pademme
Editor: Pipit Maizier

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4) Freeport Divestment: A Tale of Losses and Waste
31 January 2019 19:52 WIB
TEMPO.COJakarta - Wrapped up in the spirit of nationalism, now we know that the Freeport’s share divestment was a very costly one. After having to shell out Rp55.8 trillion to acquire 51.23 percent of the shares, the government now must deal with the massive environmental damage caused by improper management of tailings or mining wastes. 
According to the findings of the Supreme Audit Agency (BPK) released in 2017, the losses from the environmental damages totaled Rp185 trillion. The destruction was resulted by the substandard tailing storage management along the Ajikwa river in Mimika regency, Papua. The high costs of the losses include Rp10.7 trillion at the upstream area, Rp8.2 trillion at the estuary and at Rp166 trillion at the Arafura sea. The company committed a serious violation when the tailing storage which is restricted to just 230 square kilometers in the upstream area encroached into the estuary. 
Unfortunately for the government, it did not tackle the issue when the gold mine was still controlled by Freeport-McMoRan, which should have been slapped with heavy sanctions. It also failed to use the issue as a leverage to get a better deal. The problem that was swept under the rug for years now has become a huge and costly environmental threat. 
Freeport has deposited mining waste in Ajikwa river’s upstream basin since 1995. With the daily capacity of 300,000 tons, it produces around 230,000 tons of waste, according to the audit agency. This is plausible since only 3 percent of the all the earth that was excavated and processed contains minerals and most of the rest is disposed. The excessive tailing waste severely polluted the river, the forests and sago fields. The locals also found themselves isolated as a result. 
The locals living around the mine may have been contented with the inducement money given by the mining company. Freeport actively gave away yearly religious donation of around Rp85 billions which was distributed via the Papua regional government, the Mimika provincial government and tribal organizations. 
Now that the majority shares have been taken over through Indonesia Asahan Aluminum (Inalum), the government must be prepared to bear all the consequences. It must prove that Inalum is capable of managing the waste better. The company must prevent further environmental damage. The environmental management road map agreed upon between the environmental ministry andFreeport must be thoroughly implemented. 
The most pressing issues that need to be addressed immediately include the reduction of non-tailing sediment in the mining areas and the construction of new dikes at the reservoir to put the lid on tailing spills. 
From the environmental aspect, it makes sense if production is decreased to reduce tailing but economic calculations give a different result. If the production decreases, the state’s income will also plummet. It seems an unlikely solution at a time when the government needs to prove that the investment in the share divestment can be recouped soon. The government must now resolve all issues without blaming other parties and make sure that such environmental disasters will not recur in the future.
Read the complete story in this week's edition of Tempo English Magazine
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5) Governor’s objection to Freeport not be regarded as a political decision
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Jayapura, Jubi – Papuan Parliament member of Commission I Yonas Nusy expect people do not regard the Papuan governor’s decision to object the letter of the Environment and Forestry Ministry on the recommendation of 1000 hectares of lands to Freeport for mining exploration from the political perspective.
“The governor’s decision should not be regarded as a political objection, but it’s more to his attempt to protect the protected forest area and Lorentz National Park,” said Nusy on Wednesday (23/1/2019).
Besides, according to him, the expansion of Freeport’s mining exploration areas should be further discussed with the customary landowners. “Even though Papua is part of Indonesia, this land (Papua) is the land of indigenous. Therefore, its customary law should be respected,” he said.
Meanwhile, Papuan Regional Secretary Herry Dosinaen said about Papuan Governor’s response on the ministry’s letter to permit 1000 hectares of land for Freeport’s mining area concession.
“Last time they asked for 2800 hectares, and now more 1000 hectares. But the governor refused it,” said Dosinaen.
He said the reason behind this objection is because the area is part of the forest conservation area and Lorentz National Park that is protected by the government. (*)
Reporter: Arjuna Pademme
Editor: Pipit Maizier
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6) Freeport’s tax debt affects Papuan Regional Budget 2019
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on
 



Jayapura, Jubi – Papuan Primary Regional Budget (APBD) 2019 reportedly decreased to IDR 13.9 trillion from IDR 14.142 trillion last year due to Freeport’s tax debt on the water surface.


Papuan Provincial Secretary Hery Dosinaen said the tax debt affected the decline of provincial income that then droved to the decrease of the total revenue of the main provincial budget.
“Provincial revenue has decreased because we cannot meet our target due to the delayed tax payment by Freeport,” said Dosinaen in Jayapura.
However, the provincial government said they would not negotiate with the company about this late payment. Further, the governor refused Freeport to pay their tax based on goodwill but their income and profits. “This has caused the out-target payment. Even the plenary to discuss the water surface tax 2017-2018 is still running until now,” he said.
Meanwhile, the First Vice Chairman of Papua Parliament Edoardus Kaize said Papua Provincial Budget 2019 consists more than IDR 895.8 billion in local incomes, more than IDR 4.4 trillion in a balanced fund, and IDR 8.6 trillion in net revenue.
“However, the regional expenditures were more than IDR 13.8 trillion consisted of IDR 6.6 trillion of indirect expenditures, IDR 7.2 trillion of direct expenditures and IDR 50 billion of budget surplus,” said Kaize. (*)
 Reporter: Alexander Loen
Editor: Pipit Maizier
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